Monthly Archives: April 2015

2015 Spring CSA – Week 7

***This is an ODD week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Bluffton (On-Farm), Columbus, Dothan, Thomasville & Tallahassee.

Farm musings:

Announcements to all CSA egg members, our new flock of laying hens has arrived. They are starting to produce and we will have smaller eggs for the next few weeks. We wanted to let you know that you will notice that the eggs are smaller, however this is the normal growing pattern of a new flock. They produce Small eggs and move their way up to Jumbo as the week’s progress.

In other farm news we are excited to welcome three new livestock specialists. Each has a unique background, as well as area of focus. As they start to make their way to the farm, I imagine that Amber will post their interviews on the blog as she has for others. Look out for their stories in the weeks to come!

New This Share: Breakfast Radishes & Sweet Onions

Radishes: Remove tops from roots and store in a half zipped baggie. Enjoy braised, or lightly sauteed, pairs well with eggs. A favorite of mine is sweet and spicy pickled radishes.

Sweet Onions: Harvested fresh out of the ground! These are best enjoyed fresh, not meant for storage. A beautiful way to highlight the fresh flavor in this onion is to caramelize. The Kitchn, walks you through the perfect caramelization of an onion. Pair this with fresh pasta, burgers, bruschetta, or flatbreads would be amazing.

Spotlight Vegetable: Fennel

During Colonial times, early Americans would hang fennel in the spring to freshen rooms. It has also been used as a breath freshener, and a medicinal additive to make the taste more palatable. Due to its sweet licorice flavor profile, it has hung around in American gardens since the birth of North America.

If you still have some of this lovely bulb hanging out in your fridge, we have a recommendation for your culinary endeavors. Fennel’s sweet and slight crisp allow for a wonderful addition to salads (grain and green). I would imagine pickled fennel would be a quite an interesting flavor pop! It is also known to pair well with fish, as well as cocktails, check out this muddled fennel, lime, grapefruit, and tequila aperitif. (Rosemary also lends a beautiful piney note, to cocktails, I love it muddled with lime and grapefruit)

Organic Share Items

Breakfast Radishes: braised, fresh, garnishes (soup, salad, sandwich), omelets, pickled, relished, roasted, slaw.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Sweet Onions: braised, jams, pickled, roasted, stuffed,

Storage: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Mint: butter mints, chickpea salad, chutney, coolers, cocktails, Feta-watermelon salads, grain salad, infused waters, pesto, smoothie, simple syrup, sorbet, tea, & yogurt dip.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Baby Carrots: candied, juiced, muffins, raw, salad, steamed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Kale: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stew

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Head Lettuce: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches, braised, raw, wraps

Storage: Remove from bag, store in an airtight container.

Cabbage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Storage: braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps.

Bunching Onions: garnish, marinades, salsa, & soup/stews.

Storage: Remove rubber band, wrap bulbs in damp paper towel

Swiss Chard: braise, pesto, pickling (stems), raw, salads, stir-fry, sautéed, wraps.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Collards: dumplings, egg rolls, pesto, pot stickers, raw, risotto, salads, sautéed, spring rolls, stews, stir-fry, & wraps.

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Baby Fennel: braised, raw salads, risotto, roasted, stews & soups

Storage: Short term storage- in a shallow dish of water on the counter. Long term storage- place in an air tight container with a little water.

Rosemary: Breads, cocktail, herb marinade, olive oil infusions, lamb, pasta, pork, potatoes, poultry

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Categories: CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) | Tags: | 2 Comments

Life on the Farm: Q&A with Will Harris

will harris

1. Do you remember your first day “taking over” the farm? Can you describe it for us?
EXCEPT FOR MY 4 YEARS AT COLLEGE, I HAVE LIVED AND WORKED ON THIS FARM ALL OF MY LIFE.  I HAVE NEVER WANTED TO DO ANYTHING EXCEPT RUN THIS FARM.  I MAJORED IN ANIMAL SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA IN PREPARATION FOR DOING THIS.

WHEN I GRADUATED FROM COLLEGE, I EXPECTED MY FATHER TO GO AND SIT ON THE PORCH SO THAT I COULD RUN THE FARM.  HE HAD A VERY DIFFERENT IDEA.

HE WAS AN ONLY CHILD, AND I WAS AN ONLY CHILD.  EITHER OF THESE WAS PRETTY UNUSUAL FOR OUR GENERATIONS.  IT WAS UNHEARD OF THE STACK THEM.

WE WERE LIKE TWO BROTHERS, FATHER & SON, BUSINESS PARTNERS, AND BEST FRIENDS.  WE COULD HUNT & FISH TOGETHER, EAT & DRINK TOGETHER, BUT WE COULD NOT WORK TOGETHER.  HE WAS THE ORDAINED KING, AND I HAD OPINIONS THAT I JUST COULD NOT KEEP TO MYSELF.  WE PISSED EACH OTHER OFF.  IT WAS BAD.

HE WAS TOO SMART TO LET US LIVE IN A COMBATIVE SITUATION. HE AVOIDED THIS BY MAKING ME GET AN OFF FARM JOB IMMEDIATELY AFTER GRADUATION.  I BECAME THE REGIONAL MANAGER OF A FARMER COOPERATIVE.  WE RAN COTTON GINS, PEANUT MILLS, FERTILIZER BLENDERS, AND GRAIN ELEVATORS.  IT WAS GREAT EXPERIENCE FOR ME AND I COULD NOT HAVE DONE THE THINGS, IN THE MANAGEMENT OF THIS FARM, THAT I HAVE DONE IF I HAD NOT HAD THIS EXPERIENCE FORCED ON ME.

BUT… I ALWAYS LIVED ON THIS FARM, AND WAS ALWAYS VERY INVOLVED IN WORKING ON THE FARM.  I WORKED 40 HOURS EACH WEEK FOR THE CO-OP, AND OVER 40 HOURS MORE EACH WEEK ON THE FARM.  I ONCE COMPLAINED ABOUT HOW I WORKED ALL OF THE TIME.  DADDY SAID “YOU DON’T WORK BUT HALF OF THE TIME”.  HE MEANT 12 HOURS OF THE DAY, 7 DAYS PER WEEK.  HE SAID THAT IF A MAN WANTS TO “ACCUMULATE SOMETHING” HE NEEDS TO WORK MORE THAN HALF OF THE TIME.

ONE HOT DAY, IN 1995, DADDY DROVE HIS PICK UP TO WHERE I WAS BUILDING A NEW FENCE IN THE PASTURE.  HE SAID “DO YOU WANT THEM DAMN COWS?”.  I SAID “HELL YES I WANT THEM DAMN COWS.  THAT IS WHY I’M BUILDING THIS DAMN FENCE”.  HE SAID “TAKE THEM”, AND HE DROVE OFF.  AND THE TRANSFER OF OWNERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT WAS DONE.  WE HAD NEVER DISCUSSED ANY SORT OF TRANSFER BEFORE THIS AND, EXCEPT FOR THAT EXCHANGE, WE NEVER DID AFTER EITHER.

I KNOW THAT DADDY GAVE IT UP THAT DAY BECAUSE HE WAS BEGINNING TO FEEL THE FIRST SIGNS OF DEMENTIA.  HE NOR I NEVER ACKNOWLEDGED IT, BUT THAT WAS THE DEAL.  IT SLOWLY KILLED HIM OVER THE NEXT FIVE LONG AND SAD YEARS.

AFTER THAT DISCUSSION ON THAT HOT DAY, HE NEVER TOOK ANY SORT OF ACTIVE ROLE ON THE FARM.  NONE AT ALL.  IT WAS VERY TRAGIC THAT IT HAD TO BE THAT WAY.

2. On January 1, 2014, two of your daughters were officially back on the farm and White Oak Pastures employees. What was that day like for you?
THE BEST DAMN TIME OF MY LIFE.  THE STORY ABOVE WILL GIVE YOU INSIGHT AS TO WHY.

3. I just picked up my first batch of layers today. Although I feel responsible for the current layers in the pasture, I feel more bonded to, or just more responsible for the ones I got today. It’s the first ones I hope to raise from start to finish. How did you feel when you bought/slaughtered/sold your first cow?
YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THE STEWARDSHIP OF THESE CHICKS. STEWARDSHIP OF YOUR OWN LAND AND ANIMALS IS THE CLOSEST THAT PEOPLE CAN EVER COME TO FEELING THE COMPASSION OF GOD FOR HIS SUBJECTS.  MOST PEOPLE NEVER GET THAT.

4. What do you look forward to the most about retirement? Or do farmers every truly retire?
MY RETIREMENT WILL CONSIST OF GRADUALLY HANDING OFF DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES, UNTIL I HAVE NONE LEFT.  WHEN THERE ARE NONE LEFT, IF MY HEALTH IS GOOD, I WILL RIDE A HORSE AROUND THE FARM ALL DAY EVERY DAY.

 

If you have any questions for Will, please leave them in the comments section and I’ll do my best to get an answer for you!

Categories: Animal Welfare, Regenerative Land Management, Rural Community, Staff Spotlight | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Life on the Farm: Words of Wisdom by Will Harris

will smiling

An article posted in the American Grassfed Association newsletter, that I thought you all may enjoy…

“At this time I feel compelled to talk about the market that we are operating in.  We are in uncharted territory with regard to the prices that our livestock is bringing.  I think that we all need to give some consideration to how we got to this point.  Here’s my take on this:…

Congratulations to all of us.  Today we are producing livestock in the most profitable period of time in anyone’s recollection.  This is great, and we are grateful…but it ain’t always going to be this way.

We must not lose sight of the fact that our current economic success is the result of the nation’s diminished supply of animal protein (primarily beef).  This diminished supply is a result of ruminant herd liquidation, which came about due to many years of unprofitable calf, lamb, and kid production.That is to say that our current year’s profits in the livestock business were bought and paid for by our prior year’s losses.  Mine and yours.

This cyclical supply & demand, profit & loss, is a function of the commodity beef business.  There is no protection from this cycle for producers who raise calves for ultimate sale to multi-national protein companies.  It is a way of life (and death).

AGA members have opted to exit this system.  We endeavor to raise our animals for sale to more sophisticated consumers.  These are consumers who have studied our nation’s meat and poultry production systems.  Many of these more informed consumers have made lifestyle changes regarding what they eat.  These consumers choose to pay a little more to buy meat and poultry that allows them to be raised in a manner that is more sustainable, humane and fair.

AGA members who have exited the commodity system pay a high price to get out.  Production, processing, and marketing meat and poultry from a non-commodity system is much more difficult, riskier and more expensive for the producer.  Producers can easily add value to their products and not be able to extract this added value from the marketplace.  It ain’t easy.  In fact, it is damned hard.  In fact, it is the hardest damned thing that I have ever done in my life.

AGA members who have exited this system face hardship from many fronts:  National livestock organizations vehemently oppose mandatory country-of-origin labeling that helps prevent the importation of “grassfed” beef without the knowledge of consumers.  Multi-national protein companies brilliantly word smith, green wash, and trick label their products to hopelessly confuse consumers.  Government bureaucracies heavy handedly impose regulations that are not applicable to small operations.  This list goes on and on…

These difficulties are part of what makes me proud to be part of the American Grassfed Association.  This grassroots (no pun intended) organization is one of the few places where like-minded producers can unite in an effort to understand the forces that stand in the way of our journey to gain a sustainable, humane, and fair livestock production system.”

Categories: Animal Welfare, Regenerative Land Management, Rural Community, Staff Spotlight | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Spring CSA – Week 6

**This is an Even Week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Albany & Atlanta.

All hail the Tornado!

Do you ever feel as though things are out of control, or least yours?

Spring rains are beautiful, and deadly. Since moving to Georgia, I have been fortunate enough to live under a tin roof. I always thought they were quaint, and of another time. However in this part of the country, they are very much part of current building practices. Last night, sitting with the windows open I took in the thunderous deluge. It was a wild mixture of beauty and respect, I relaxed into the sound, all the while thinking of our field crops. The amount of rain directly effects, the daily activities of the garden. This heavy rain, has slowed planting, and caused ideal conditions for microbe activity. However! The sun is out, shining and drying our water soaked fields. We are so glad to see the sun, and feel it on our skin.

Keep thinking thoughts of sunshine, and splendor!

New This Share: Marjoram & Cabbage

Marjoram: Known for its complex floral and woodsy flavor. Pairs well with vegetables, & proteins (meats, fish & eggs) alike. It is found in savory dishes, and plays well with other herbs. It can be used fresh or dried. If using fresh, add it towards the end of cooking so the delicate flavor isn’t lost in cooking process. Can be used in salad dressings, marinades, and other flavor filled applications!

Cabbage: A longtime friend of the home gardener. Found in the growing in fields, stored in fridges, and fermenting in larders all over the world. It is universally excepted, and prepared in wildly unique ways on various continents.

My new favorite improvised recipe: Quick Kimchi

On a whim, we tried making a spin off the traditional Korean Kimchi. Of course, it does not display the traditional full flavor profile of Kimchi. However, it is full of flavor and a quick way to whip up something spectacular.

Rough cut half a head of cabbage, toss in a deep bowl. Pour in 2Tbs. apple cider vinegar, and two pinches of kosher salt. Using your hands (this is a messy recipe), bruise the chopped leaves, crushing them between your clenched fists. While bruising the cabbage you are also dispersing the vinegar and salt. Add in two pinches of sugar (cane, brown, maple syrup), ¼ tsp of chipotle pwd., 1tsp of chipotle in adobo sauce (chopped, or salsa). Mix in all ingredients with your hands, finish with fresh lime juice, taste. Based on your palate add more of any of the above mentioned ingredients, then enjoy! Best enjoyed after resting for at least 20min, (it is really difficult to not snack on it once it is first made, but it becomes so much richer after it ages).

Spotlight Vegetable: The humble lovable Cabbage

She is the mother, she is the beginning. She is the umbrella that most of your favorite garden varieties fall under: kale, collards, Brussels sprouts, turnips, rutabagas, broccoli, cauliflower and so many others.

The cabbage is cultivated in the cooler months, and harvested before the deep freeze of winter, or the heat of summer. The varieties are endless, check out this article to view some rare and beautiful heirloom cabbages.

Try moving out of your cabbage comfort zone, try grilling a wedge, or braising some to pair with fish or lamb. Kraut, kimchi, and cabbage rolls all have fermentation stages, this green beauty was meant to ferment!

Organic Share List

Organic Share Items

Baby Carrots: candied, juiced, muffins, raw, salad, steamed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Kale: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stew

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Head Lettuce: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches, braised, raw, wraps

Storage: Remove from bag, store in an airtight container.

Cabbage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Storage: braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps.

Bunching Onions: garnish, marinades, salsa, & soup/stews.

Storage: Remove rubber band, wrap bulbs in damp paper towel

Braising Mix: braised, fresh, burritos/tacos, pasta, pizza, salad, & soup/stew.

Storage: Remove from plastic bag, place in open container, wrap with a dry kitchen towel to absorb moisture.

Swiss Chard: braise, pesto, pickling (stems), raw, salads, stir-fry, sautéed, wraps.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Collards: dumplings, egg rolls, pesto, pot stickers, raw, risotto, salads, sautéed, spring rolls, stews, stir-fry, & wraps.

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Rosemary: Breads, cocktail, herb marinade, olive oil infusions, lamb, pasta, pork, potatoes, poultry

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Marjoram OR Sage: “add it last”, poultry, marinades, meat, salad dressings, sauces, stuffing

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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Spring CSA – Week 5

Error Correction:

**This is an Odd week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Columbus, Dothan, Thomasville & Tallahassee.

This is week 5, an odd week!

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Spring CSA -Week 5

**This is an Odd week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Columbus, Dothan, Thomasville & Tallahassee.

The clouds hang low in their sky, they darken the heavens, and release sweet rain. Spring is the delicate dance between temperature and rainfall. We pray that late season cold snaps don’t arrive, and that rain is consistent but not overwhelming. The warm damp climate that comes with spring, creates an ideal environment for critters: bug and fungal alike. All souls love the spring, it foretells of life and love and new beginnings. As you enjoy the spring beauty, please think to your farmers in the rain, and your plants in the elements. Think of your plants when the temperature drops to freezing, and when torrential storms come to town.

All of these things effect the growing cycle of the plants, we are the caretakers of the vegetables, but they do all the work. They convert sunlight, water and nutrients into pure energy, harvesting and growing with each day. It is a beautiful thing to behold. They are resistant to so many things, and yet produce lovely edible matter. Think of your vegetables, connect through the weather. As the spring sun warms the skin on your face, it also lend life to the plants of the garden. The water that you wipe off your windshield, is also harvested through the roots of the ground dwellers. It is an interesting thought, to see the weather we encounter through the perspective of a plant.

New this Week: Collards, Baby Fennel

Collards: leaves can be used as a sturdy wrap for sandwiches, or to wrap fish in as it bakes in the oven, or even as a new take on cabbage rolls. The leaf is versatile, and wonderful lightly braised. It can be stored as you would a kale, or chard.

Baby Fennel: Fennel is most notable for its sweet flavor. Braising it with your baby carrots would make an excellent side dish. The fronds will cook down for a lovely vegetable/chicken stock. We encourage you to freeze the fronds, until you are ready to use them.

Spotlight Veggie: Collards

The original collard was non-heading cabbage. There was a divide among the southern and northern states about what a proper cabbage should consist of. Many of the northern families thought that the non-heading cabbage was defective, whereas the southern families began collecting seed and cultivating the modern day collard. The first recording of seed swapping for collard specific varieties was during 1860-1870, and were first on the market for sale in 1875.

They are notably a southern favorite, and have long held a place at family dinners. There beautiful leaves create a rosette in a mature plant, they are known for their prominent flavor and heat tolerance.

Organic Share Items

Baby Carrots: candied, juiced, muffins, raw, salad, steamed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Kale: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stew

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Head Lettuce: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches, braised, raw, wraps

Storage: Remove from bag, store in an airtight container.

Spring Mix: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches, braised, raw, wraps

Storage: Remove from bag, store in an airtight container.

Braising Mix: braised, fresh, burritos/tacos, pasta, pizza, salad, & soup/stew.

Storage: Remove from plastic bag, place in open container, wrap with a dry kitchen towel to absorb moisture.

Baby Fennel: braised, raw salads, risotto, roasted, stews & soups

Storage: Short term storage- in a shallow dish of water on the counter. Long term storage- place in an air tight container with a little water.

Swiss Chard: braise, pesto, pickling (stems), raw, salads, stir-fry, sautéed, wraps.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Collards: dumplings, egg rolls, pesto, pot stickers, raw, risotto, salads, sautéed, spring rolls, stews, stir-fry, & wraps.

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Lemon Balm: lovely in teas, mixed drinks, and paired with items needing a perk of herbal lemon.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Mint:

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Categories: CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) | Tags: | 2 Comments

2015 Spring CSA – Week 4

**This is an Even Week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Albany & Atlanta.

Greetings from sunny South Georgia.

Spring is officially here and the heat is beginning to settle in. This warm weather is waking up hibernating critters, causing our reptilian & amphibian friends to make appearances in the garden.

While the season is still fresh, we wanted to take the time to introduce our crew, there is a mini photo shoot below. This season’s crew is comprised of New Interns, Familiar Faces, Southern Natives, & Northern Transplants. Thank you for letting us be your growers!

Spotlight Vegetable: The Carrot

In the Americas, carrots were primarily used as a livestock crop. They were inexpensive, nutritious and highly favored by livestock. In cookbooks, they were not mentioned as being served raw previous to the 1900’s (check out this site for more carrot facts). Many of the recipes treated the roots like sweet potatoes, they would boil them and serve with butter, early home cooks would even serve carrot pies and puddings, similar to that of a modern day sweet potato pie. Many households didn’t enjoy the carrot, however the modern carrot enjoys a being a favorite for many vegetable lovers.

New Items: Green Garlic, Baby Carrots, & Sage

Green Garlic – Taste profile similar to garlic flavored leek. It is the size of a scallion, the white bulb is edible, as well as the green stem. However, the further up the stem you move the more fibrous the green stem becomes. Used in pesto, potato latkes, soups, spinach pies, Braised in White Wine.

Baby Carrots – The sweet gentle crisp of a true baby carrot cannot be matched. We recommend eating them raw, or only using slight heat, pickling them is another excellent idea.

Sage – Is wonderful paired with savory items, potatoes, breads, meat dishes, and pasta. Interesting ideas to try: tempura coated sage leaves fried in olive oil (garnish or as an appetizer), Browned Butter pasta & fried sage,

Organic Share Items

Green Garlic: To be used in aoli, butter & oil infusions, dips, hummus, marinades, pesto, pickled, roasted, salsa, sauces, sautéed, soup/stew.

Storage: (Bunching Onions) Remove rubber band, wrap bulbs in damp paper towel.

Baby Carrots: candied, juiced, muffins, raw, salad, steamed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Kale: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stew

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Head Lettuce: braised, raw, wraps

Storage: Remove from bag, store in an airtight container.

Salad Mix: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches,

Storage: Remove from bag, store in an airtight container.

Spinach: sandwiches, soups/stews, wilted.

Storage: See Salad/Braising Mix.

Swiss Chard: braise, pesto, pickling (stems), raw, salads, stir-fry, sautéed, wraps.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Pak Choi: dumplings, egg rolls, pesto, pot stickers, raw, risotto, salads, sautéed, spring rolls, stews, stir-fry, & wraps.

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Rosemary: lovely in teas, mixed drinks, and paired with items needing a perk of herbal lemon.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Sage: Brown butter dishes, Brussels Sprouts, pasta, potatoes, rich & creamy dishes, roasted squash, sausage,

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Braising Mix: braised, fresh, burritos/tacos, pasta, pizza, salad, & soup/stew.

Storage: Remove from plastic bag, place in open container, wrap with a dry kitchen towel to absorb moisture.

Categories: CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) | Tags: | Leave a comment

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