How to make grassfed beef bone broth

At White Oak Pastures, we take pride in using every part of the animals we process, and broths are a way to utilize the strong, nutrient-dense bones. Check out Chef Reid’s easy how-to video and instructions for making beef bone broth at home. Enjoy this broth by itself as a rich, nourishing supplement or add it to soups and sauces for added flavor and nutrition.

Ingredients

  • 10 pounds White Oak Pastures grassfed beef bones. In this recipe, we used canoe, knuckle, marrow, oxtail, and rib bones, but choose any combination that you’d like.
  • 2 large onions, quartered
  • 3 medium-sized carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 5 stalks of celery, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar

Preparation

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Place bones in a large, shallow roasting pan. Bake bones 30-45 minutes, or until well browned, turning at the 15-minute mark. Remove from oven.

Move bones into a large pot. Pour 1/2 cup water into the roasting pan and use a wooden spatula to scrape up any fond (crusty browned bits). Add the fond mixture to the pot, then add onions, carrots, celery, bay leaves, and vinegar. Add water to cover the mixture and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 24-48 hours.

Over a large heatproof bowl, strain broth through a fine-mesh sieve, or a colandar lined with cheesecloth or 2 layers of paper towels. Remove bones, vegetables and seasoning.

Chill broth, then lift off the fat. Store fat in the refrigerator for 1 month, or freeze for 6 months to a year. Store broth in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, or freeze for 6 months to a year.

Categories: Kitchen | Tags: , , , | 4 Comments

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4 thoughts on “How to make grassfed beef bone broth

  1. humaneeccentric

    This is exactly how I do it and I hope to have access to grass fed bones soon. My dogs have always loved it and my husband and I use it when we’re feeling poorly.

  2. Chris Avers

    How do you use the fat removed from the broth? Why not just leave it in the broth?

    • White Oak Pastures

      Hi Chris, if you’d like to leave the fat in the broth, you can by all means. Just remember that when it cools, it will naturally separate, and you may not want all of that fat in your broth if you end up with a lot of it. You can use the fat as a shortening substitute, to sauté, fry or bake, just remember that it will have a “beefy” or “hearty” essence to it, since the fat rendered in the broth.

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