CSA (Community Supported Agriculture)

Meet Mary, Queen of Brussels (Sprouts)

Mary_Portrait-2

Photo by Laura Mortelliti

As we kick off the Fall season of our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, we are excited to introduce you to one of our organic garden managers, Mary Bruce! We love the way Mary involves herself in so many different functions at White Oak Pastures: she’s also a leather craftswoman, a biodiesel chemist, and she oversees our pastured rabbit and honeybee programs. She is smart, engaged, and always has great ideas for making improvements on the farm. Meet Mary, and catch up on what she’s up to this Fall!

You began your career here as an intern. What motivated you to work your way up to a manager?
When I began working here I had no idea how many moving parts were in this farm ecosystem. My internship was really dynamic, and there were opportunities at every turn. I was lucky enough to be able to work with so many diverse departments. I soon realized that managers were entrusted with Mr. Will’s blessing to go out and conquer. The ability to orchestrate new projects, implement systems, and feel proud of the work that I was doing made me want to invest in the farm.

We have 10 different species on the farm. Which is your favorite?
The guinea fowl. They are wild, uncontained and sneak into the garden all the time! Those birds are just fun to watch, they look as though they are launching an attack when they travel in herds and let out battle cries as they advance through the open pasture. I have been startled by those feisty birds more than once. In addition to their entertainment value, they are the most succulent and flavorful poultry that I have ever eaten. The complexity of their taste is unmatched in stocks, soups, sauces, grilling, and roasting. If you haven’t yet taken the leap, make sure you invite guinea to your next dinner party!

What is the most satisfying part of your job?
Being able to fully engage in a project. There are so many opportunities to team up with other departments in order to make the system more dynamic. We have been using the rabbits to “mow down” garden crops that we are finished harvesting and fertilize the land that they are grazing. We have also introduced a set of piglets to the garden that act as four legged tractors. They till, eat roots and debris, and break up the compaction. Using animals as tools for change has really altered the way I view farming.

What is your favorite meal to cook at home?
Tacos, burritos, and carnitas with marinated steak, pulled/ground pork, and even Mediterranean style tacos stuffed with our lamb. My favorite farm fresh toppings include: vinegar cabbage slaw, onions, microgreens, radishes, pickled carrots, homemade chipotle garlic aioli (from our pastured eggs). We eat like kings on the farm. We have the freshest produce, and most scrumptious proteins. You cannot go wrong when you have all of this great food at your fingertips.

What has been your proudest moment since working here?
I have been blessed to work on a lot of diverse projects during my time here and each one had its pinnacle.  Whenever something that I have directly had my hands on has been complimented or appreciated it really makes me proud of the work that I do. Two standout moments would be our first retail account for leather goods, and the first successful batch of biodiesel. Most recently, I have been delighted with the experimental hay pile garden. That patch of pasture is teeming with life above and below the surface, with so many plant species, beneficial insects, and even beautiful displays of fungal fruiting bodies. I am really proud of the habitat that is forming, and the things that it is teaching me.

What are you most looking forward to for the Fall season?
I am most looking forward to our annual CSA dinner (stay tuned for details!). This will be our third season hosting a dinner for our members. Last year was uniquely special; the full menu was crafted and prepared by the very same staff that plants, harvests and packs our CSA shares. Our members had the chance to spend time on the farm, see the full the process, and connect with their growers and farmers. This dinner gets to the heart of the CSA philosophy, connecting eaters with their farmers.

There’s still time to sign up for our Fall CSA at a prorated rate! Click here for details.

Categories: CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), Staff Spotlight | Tags: , , , , , | 5 Comments

We’ve been called names

Over the years, we have accumulated a number of animal welfare and land stewardship certifications. Will likes to say he’s like a Boy Scout collecting merit badges. We feel that we owe it to our customers to meet the standards of all of these organizations, and pay their verifiers to audit us to their standards. This is because so much of our product is sold online and through distributors to consumers who live a long way from White Oak Pastures. Farmers who sell their products directly to consumers may not need these third-party verifications, since they know their customers personally.

We are convinced that the best verification is to visit the farm in person. This is why we built on-farm lodging, an on-farm restaurant, and we host farm tours and events. Y’all come and see us. In the meantime, here is a quick rundown of our certifications and labels.

 

AGA logo

What is certified: Our cattle, goats, and sheep

In 1995, we decided the right thing to do for our cattle herd would be to transition to a grassfed pastured program. We later added additional ruminant species, and now our cattle, goats and sheep are certified grassfed by the American Grassfed Association (AGA). AGA defines grassfed animals as “those that have eaten nothing but grass and forage from weaning to harvest, have not been raised in confinement, and have never been fed antibiotics or growth hormones. In addition, all AGA-Certified Producers are American family farms and their livestock is born and raised in the U.S.”

 

AWA logo

What is certified: Our cattle, chickens, and eggs

Animal Welfare Approved (AWA) is a food label for meat and dairy products that come from farm animals raised outdoors on pasture. Our cattle,  chickens, and eggs are certified by AWA, as well as our on-farm, USDA-inspected red meat and poultry abattoirs. As much as we are committed to providing our animals with a peaceful, healthy life, we are committed to offering them a humane and dignified death. Our facilities, designed by Dr. Temple Grandin, are focused on keeping the animals at ease.

 

savory-network

What is certified: Our land

The Savory Institute promotes large-scale restoration of the world’s grasslands through holistic management. We have been named a Savory Institute Training Hub, an honor given to 17 organizations across the globe to provide education and support on regenerative farming to other land managers. We believe that sustainability isn’t enough; agriculture has to be regenerative. Practicing the Serengeti Grazing Model, we rotate complimentary animal species side-by-side through our pastures. All species naturally fertilize the land, and our soil is a living organic medium that teems with life.

 

GAP logo

What is certified: Our cattle, pigs, chickens, and turkeys

Global Animal Partnership’s tiered rating system recognizes advanced methods of allowing animals to express their behavior. White Oak Pastures is certified at the highest level, Step 5+, indicating our animals are raised on pasture, with no physical alterations, and they spend their entire lives on the same farm. We were one of the first farms in the U.S. to receive GAP certification for beef production, participating in the pilot program in 2010.

 

NON-GMO LOGO

What is certified: Our poultry, eggs, pigs, and rabbits

Most of the corn and soybeans grown in the U.S. are produced using genetically-modified seeds, which means a majority of poultry, pig, and rabbit feed includes GMOs. For years we struggled to find a feed mill that could consistently supply enough non-GMO feed for our farm. In May 2016, we became verified by the Non-GMO Project, a non-profit organization offering third party verification and labeling for non-GMO food and products.

 

Organic logo

What is certified: Our land and vegetables, fruits, and nuts

The federal government oversees the USDA Organic program, certifying products produced without synthetic ingredients, synthetic pesticides, growth hormones, or genetic engineering. All of our land is certified organic, except that land which we have recently leased or purchased to transition to organic pasture. White Oak Pastures is proud to be the largest certified organic farm in Georgia. Using the same methods Will’s great-grandfather used a century-and-a-half ago, we proactively support nature’s food chain using only sun, soil, and rain to grow organic sweet grasses for our animals to eat.

 

chlogo2

What is certified: Our cattle, goats, sheep, pigs, chickens, and eggs

Certified Humane is the label of Humane Farm Animal Care, an international non-profit certification organization that works to improve the lives of farm animals by driving consumer demand for kinder and more responsible farm animal practices. Third party auditors ensure farms meet standards that ensure animals are raised in an environment where they can engage in natural, innate behaviors. For example, chickens are able to flap their wings and dust bathe, and pigs have the space to move around and root.

 

CNG logo

What is certified: Our vegetables, fruits and nuts, bees, and goats and sheep

Certified Naturally Grown (CNG) offers peer-reviewed certification to farmers and beekeepers producing food for their local communities by working in harmony with nature, without relying on synthetic chemicals or GMOs. The main difference between CNG and USDA Organic is the certification model, which relies on peer inspections, transparency, and direct relationships. The livestock standards are based on the USDA Organic standards, but additionally require access to pasture and feed grown according to CNG standards.

Categories: Animal Welfare, CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), Regenerative Land Management | 6 Comments

Organic spring vegetables at White Oak Pastures

We just kicked off the Spring season of our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. Our Organic Farm Managers, Ryan Carnley and Mary Bruce, and our garden team are busy planting, harvesting, washing, packing, and delivering organic produce to our wonderful CSA members.

Here is how it works: we offer “shares” to the community, which consist of 6-8 unique produce offerings each week of the season. Members pay a fee at the beginning of the season in exchange for a weekly delivery of fresh vegetables, fruits, and nuts.

The arrangement is mutually dependent and mutually beneficial, which builds a lot of trust between our farmers and our members. Our CSA members’ support allows us to operate seasonally and year-round because we have a consistent customer base. As nature dictates the outcome of the growing season, our customers share the risk with us. We call them our CSA family because we experience the ups and downs of the seasons together.

The CSA program is unique in many ways. Our members get the opportunity to eat both locally and seasonally, learning about and experiencing the variety of produce that is available each week in Southern Georgia. Customers also get to know our farmers and ask questions, having face-to-face interactions each week on delivery day.

It’s not too late to sign up for the Spring CSA at a prorated rate. This season, a share might include the following items: kale or collard greens, carrots or beets, bunching onions, spinach or spring mix, swiss chard, broccoli, pac choy or tatsoi, and blackberries. Here in our garden, we love all of the seasons and we hope you will, too!

Categories: CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) | Tags: | 2 Comments

2015 Fall CSA – Week 34

Week 34

This is an even week and the last week of the 2015 season. Thank you for your continued supported throughout the season. If you’re on Facebook, please head on over to the White Oak Pastures page for up-to-date information on the gardens growing’s on. Holiday meats can still be ordered online and picked up at the farm.

I hope you all have received your CSA application by now. There are a few changes that I believe will benefit everyone and all will enjoy immensely. Please email me to request an application if you have not received one. Thank you to the folks who braved the icky weather two weeks ago and were part of the CSA dinner! It was a wonderful event for both the members as well as us farmers.

If you have questions about the 2016 CSA changes please email me at Mary.Bruce@Whiteoakpastures.com

Organic Share Items       

Sugar Cane: Snacking raw, juicing, infusing, sweetened skewers for kebabs

Storage: Keep in the fridge until ready to enjoy. Wrap both ends in a damp paper towel to retain moisture.

Mustard Greens: falafels, tabbouleh, stir-fry, Spicy slaw, pesto, braised

Storage: Remove rubber band from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Cabbage OR Chinese cabbage: dumplings, pot stickers, raw, salads, sautéed, stews, stir-fry, & wraps.

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Radicchio: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches, braised, raw, wraps

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Carrots: salads, slaw, snacking, roasted

Storage: Place carrots in a zip lock bag, greens can be broken off and stored in separate bag or container.  

Sweet Potatoes: mashed, candied, baked or roasted,

Storage: Store dirty, in dry well ventilated area. Never store near onions.

Herbs: Mint and Rosemary

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2015 Fall CSA – Week 32

Week 32

This is an even week.

A warm welcome from your favorite gardeners, we have had such a wonderful year of growing. This is a bitter sweet time in the year for our team. Members of our farm family are preparing to leave for their next adventures in vegetables. This is also the ending point in our CSA season, we will have this share and two more weeks of lovely produce. After that we will be re grouping for the winter season!

I am really looking forward to putting the 2016 application in your hands and homes! We have some new changes that are exciting and I think that they will be welcomed by our CSA family. Keep your eyes peeled the application will soon be out!

If you have any thoughts, comments or recipes that you would like to share with the garden please send them to my email at: Mary.Bruce@Whiteoakpastures.com

Share List

Organic Share Items       

Sugar Cane: Snacking raw, juicing, infusing, sweetened skewers for kebabs.

Storage: Keep in the fridge until ready to enjoy. Wrap both ends in a damp paper towel to retain moisture.

Mustard Greens: falafels, tabbouleh, stir-fry, Spicy slaw, pesto, braised,

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Cabbage OR Chinese cabbage: dumplings, egg rolls, pesto, pot stickers, raw, risotto, salads, sautéed, spring rolls, stews, stir-fry, & wraps.

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Head Lettuce: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches, braised, raw, wraps

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Turnips (Purple Top OR Hakurei): Salads, Slaw,

Storage: Remove Rubber Bands, break greens from the roots. Store separately, keep roots in a half zipped zip lock, and store the tops like kale.

Sweet Potatoes: Not suitable to bake until cured. Perfect for mashing, candied, fried and boiling.

Storage: Store dirty, in dry well ventilated area. Never store near onions.

Pac Choy: braised, encouragement for homemade salad dressings, roasted, salads, sandwiches, wraps.

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Totsoi: braised, encouragement for homemade salad dressings, roasted, salads, sandwiches, wraps.

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Kale OR Collards: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Basil: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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2015 Fall CSA – Week 31

Week 31

This is an odd week.

As for this week we have so many beautiful greens to offer. I hope that your fridges are filling up with yummy greens and that your dreams are filled with sautés, stir fry, soups and many other wonderful meals including these greens.

For all of those lovely creatures that have sent in their RSVP we are delighted to host you on farm. Our staff is whipping up something wonderful for you.

We are in the home stretch and as such we are planning out our 2016 CSA program. I hope that you will join us for another wonderful year of growing and eating.

Organic Share Items

Chinese cabbage: dumplings, egg rolls, pesto, pot stickers, raw, risotto, salads, sautéed, spring rolls, stews, stir-fry, & wraps.

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Head Lettuce: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches, braised, raw, wraps

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Turnips (Purple Top OR Hakurei): Salads, Slaw,

Storage: Remove Rubber Bands, break greens from the roots. Store separately, keep roots in a half zipped zip lock, store the tops like kale.

Sweet Potatoes: Not suitable to bake until cured. Perfect for mashing, candied, fried and boiling.

Storage: Store dirty, in dry well ventilated area. Never store near onions.

Pac Choy: braised, encouragement for homemade salad dressings, roasted, salads, sandwiches, wraps.

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Totsoi: braised, encouragement for homemade salad dressings, roasted, salads, sandwiches, wraps.

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Kale: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Radishes: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Basil: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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2015 Fall CSA – Week 29

Week 29

This is an odd week.

We only have 5 more deliveries left in the season, how sad is that?!

How crazy to think that we have celebrated 29 weeks of fresh produce. We will be slowly winding down for the season, and then gearing up for our winter CSA. Please keep an eye out for our 2016 CSA application!

The deadline for the CSA dinner RSVP is closely approaching, so get in your head count if you plan on attending. And a big thank you to all of our members that are planning to share a meal with our staff!

New this share: Pac Choy, Totsoi, Radishes, Purple Top Turnips

Pac Choy & Totsoi: Both of these Asian greens have distinct flavors and are wonderful in stir fry, dumplings, grain salads, and soups. They pair well with hearty meats or mushrooms.

Radishes: crisp, spicy, refreshing. Little beauties that add a punch to any salad, soup, or dish.

Purple Top Turnips: They can be turned into fries, mashed, braised, pureed, gratin, and so much more.

And now for the veggies:

Organic Share Items:

Turnips (Purple Top OR Hakurei): Salads, Slaw,

Storage: Remove Rubber Bands, break greens from the roots. Store separately, keep roots in a half zipped zip lock, store the tops like kale.

Uncured (fresh) Sweet Potatoes: Not suitable to bake until cured. Perfect for mashing, candied, fried and boiling.

Storage: Store dirty, in a sunny, hot, dry location. (sun porch, back seat in your car, greenhouses, or a sunny window). Keep in the sun for 10-14 days before enjoying your newly cured spuds!

Red Russian Kale: chips, creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Tokyo Bekana OR Pac Choy: braised, encouragement for homemade salad dressings, roasted, salads, sandwiches, wraps.

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Totsoi: braised, encouragement for homemade salad dressings, roasted, salads, sandwiches, wraps.

Storage: store in an airtight container.

Eggplant (Aubergine) OR Squash: baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets.

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Collards or Dino Kale: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Onions OR Radishes: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Okra: baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Basil OR Marjoram: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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2015 Fall CSA – Week 28

This is an Even Week!

The weather lately has been mysterious: sheets of rain, thickets of fog, and brilliant sunshine peeking through voluptuous clouds. The skies that surround White Oak are vast and uninterrupted, it is very present in our minds. We wish for dry days to plant the fields, followed by rain to water them in. I feel as though this fall we are just waiting. Waiting for the rain that never comes, and once it arrives it never stops. Waiting for days to plant, and days to harvest. Patiently waiting to enter the fields once again.

Autumn, a transition season, a season perfect for waiting. As nature starts to shift into a different state, the weather moves along. Sometimes violently, sometime unnoticed. And we wait. Fall is a time for fires, and sweaters, cook outs, and late night conversations. It prepares us for the cold, and ushers us into the holiday season. Take this time to reflect on the coming months, and the transitions that will be occurring in this new season. Plan to spend time with loved ones, share meals and memories. Pull out cool weather recipes and reflect on what it means to eat seasonally.

New This Share: Tokyo Bekana & Head Lettuce

Tokyo Bekana: Lovely, crisp, delicate, and perfect for fresh salads and sandwiches. This is part of the Asian greens/cabbage family. It is perfect for a light sauté or served raw.

Head Lettuce: Crisp, crunchy and ready to be devoured. These are the first lettuce heads of the season so enjoy their freshness!

Organic Share Items:

Uncured (fresh) Sweet Potatoes: Not suitable to bake until cured. Perfect for mashing, candied, fried and boiling.

Storage: Store dirty, in a sunny, hot, dry location. (sunporch, back seat in your car, greenhouses, or a sunny window). Keep in the sun for 10-14 days before enjoying your newly cured spuds!

Red Russian Kale: chips, creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Lacinato Kale: chips, creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Tokyo Bekana OR Head Lettuce: braised, encouragement for homemade salad dressings, roasted, salads, sandwiches, wraps.

Storage: Remove from bag, store in an airtight container.n an airtight container.

Eggplant (Aubergine) OR Collards: baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets. (collards) creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.(collards) Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Okra: baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Basil: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Rosemary:

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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2015 Summer CSA Week 26

Announcements!

We will be hosting our CSA dinner on Sunday November 8th! The farm tour & appetizers will start at 4pm, and the main courses will begin at 5pm. We will be offering a complimentary cork service, please bring your favorite bottle, or 6pack and we will happily keep them cool and serve you! We ask that you RSVP by Oct 25th, please email me with your head count at: Mary.Bruce@whiteoakpastures.com.

This week marks the beginning of sweet potato season! On Monday they emerged from their sandy depths, and were brought topside in order to begin their curing process. As sweet potatoes “cure” they are in fact creating an internal moisture loss barrier. It takes roughly 1-2 weeks to cure a sweet spud. They are perfectly fine to eat before cured. However, they lack the well-developed flavor of cured sweet potatoes. Over the next few weeks we will fill our greenhouse and high tunnels with sweet potatoes for curing.

Sweet potatoes are a beautiful thing, they symbolize a year round larder, a tradition from times long ago. These beautiful tubers will remain in our yearlong larder and be shared with our members through the fall and winter. Having and preparing your larder (pickling, canning, & freezing) allows you to extend the season for many of your favorites.

I know that a huge sigh of relief passed through our CSA members when the greens started showing up in our shares, and we are so glad to bring you these wonderful presents!

New This Share: Uncured Sweet Potatoes, Buckwheat, Collards, & Kale.

Sweet Potatoes: These sweet nuggets of joy are finally back in our lives! When you receive them, do not remove the soil that your find on their skin. This soil aides in their curing and storing process. They are perfectly fine with dirt on them until you are prepared to cook them. Never wash sweet potatoes, unless you are ready to cook them right then. We recommend placing your sweet spuds in a very sunny, hot, and dry location (such as a screened in porch, or in your car (park in the sun!), or in the window sill of a sunny window). Be gentle, any bruising will lead to soft spots latter on.

Buckwheat: This flowering leafy green has a deep earthy flavor, it is a nice addition to salads, sandwiches, smoothies, and soups!

Collards & Kale: You know these great greens and they are back to stay! Wonderful additions to any meal.

Organic Share Items:

Uncured (fresh) Sweet Potatoes: Not suitable to bake until cured. Perfect for mashing, candied, fried and boiling.

Storage: Store dirty, in a sunny, hot, dry location. (sunporch, back seat in your car, greenhouses, or a sunny window). Keep in the sun for 10-14 days before enjoying your newly cured spuds!

Buckwheat: braised, fresh, burritos/tacos, pasta, pizza, salad, soup/stew.

Storage: Remove from plastic bag, place in open container, wrap with a dry kitchen towel to absorb moisture.

Miniature Bunches of Kale: chips, creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Collards OR Microgreens: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Eggplant (Aubergine): baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets.

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Muscadine OR Pears: chutney, relish, tart, pie, popsicles, braised, jam,

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Okra: baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Basil: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Marjoram: “add it last”, poultry, marinades, meat, salad dressings, sauces, stuffing

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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2015 Summer CSA – Week 25

***This is an ODD week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Bluffton (On-Farm), Columbus, Dothan, & Tallahassee.

This premature taste of fall has become so sweet to us on the garden staff. The cooler mornings, crispier air, and clear evening skies have made for temperate weather. Take some time to appreciate the subtly as the seasons transition into their new form. I feel as though the summer and winter are major chords whereas the spring and fall are treated as minor hues. However, these seasons showcase the most beautiful display of weather, plant life, and crop diversity.

It is with great pleasure that I introduce our first fall time crops into our CSA shares:

The crowd pleasing: Kale! The southern staple: Collards! The ever elegant: Chinese Cabbage!

In the upcoming months we will be welcoming all manners of cool loving crops. We are so pleased to send the first of the season home with our members.

Announcement: CSA Fall Harvest Dinner

We will be hosting an on farm dinner for our members, and we are tentatively setting the date for Sunday November the 8th. We would like to welcome you and your family to dine with us. We will be serving a wide variety of items and would love for you to join us for an evening of laughter, eating and community.

Our garden crew will host the event, and will be making all the fixings! There will be a full farm tour, as well as a recipe swap! Keep checking in as we post up more details about our on farm feast! If you have any ideas please reach out to me at Mary.Bruce@whiteoakpastures.com.

Organic Share Items:

Miniature Bunches of Kale OR Collards: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, soup.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Pears OR Baby Chinese Cabbage: (Pears)Fresh, paired with goat cheese, braised, poached, baked, soufflé, (Chinese Cabbage)

Storage: Keep cold in your fridge in a plastic ziplock.

Eggplant (Aubergine): baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets.

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Muscadine: chutney, relish, tart, pie, popsicles, braised, jam,

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Hot Peppers: blackened, fresh, grilled, kabob, pepper jelly, raw, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Okra: baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Lemon Balm: Teas, tonics, simple syrups, deserts, and mixed drinks!

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Rosemary OR Sage: Brown butter dishes, Brussels Sprouts, pasta, potatoes, rich & creamy dishes, roasted squash, sausage,

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Categories: CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) | Leave a comment

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