Kitchen

Three Recipes for Our Pasture-Raised Pork Chops

Our rich, flavorful pork chops are the final product of our hog program which restores our land and supports our rural community. Our chef Reid Harrison has prepared three quick, healthy and delicious recipes using our pasture-raised, non-GMO fed, Global Animal Partnership 5+, Certified Humane pork chops. 

Pan Seared Pork Chop with White Wine Rosemary Garlic Pan Sauce

pork chop-8262.jpg

IngredientsWhite Oak Pastures Pork Chops, Salt & Pepper to Taste, 1 Lemon, 2 Cloves Garlic, 2 Sprigs fresh Rosemary, 2 Tablespoons White Wine, 1 Tablespoon Butter, 2 teaspoons Olive Oil, 2 Tablespoons Heavy Cream

Directions – Season Chops with salt and pepper to taste. Heat olive oil in pan till almost smoking. Add butter till sizzling and just starting to brown. Sear Pork Chops over medium high heat for 2-3 minutes on one side, then flip to other side and reduce heat to medium. Add garlic and rosemary to pan. Squeeze the juice of one lemon over the pork chops, garlic and rosemary. Occasionally spoon some pan sauce over the chops so that it cooks into the meat. Once the chops have reached an internal temp of 150F, remove them to a plate while you make the pan sauce. For the pan sauce, simply deglaze the pan with white wine, being sure to scrape up any brown bits off the bottom of the pan (make sure you don’t burn anything during the cooking process as this will make the pan sauce bitter). Reduce the wine by half, then pour in the cream stirring to marry the flavors, then melt in the butter – being sure to stir continuously so that the sauce does not break. Taste and season with salt and pepper if necessary. Pour over the pork chops and enjoy!

DSC_8219.jpgDSC_8241-2.jpgScreen Shot 2017-01-19 at 5.29.15 PM.jpgScreen Shot 2017-01-19 at 5.30.22 PM.jpgScreen Shot 2017-01-19 at 5.31.00 PM-2.jpgDSC_8290-2.jpg

Pan Seared Boneless Pork Chop with Red Wine Mushroom Sauce 

DSC_8325-2.jpg

Ingredients – White Oak Pastures Pork Chops, Grill Salt, 1/2 Onion Julienne, 1 Cup Sliced Mushrooms, 2 Sprigs Rosemary, 2 Cloves Garlic Minced, 2 Tablespoons Red Wine, 2 Tablespoons Heavy Cream, 1 Tablespoon Butter, Salt & Pepper to taste

Directions – Season Chops with grill-salt. Heat olive oil in pan till almost smoking. Add butter till sizzling and just starting to brown. Sear Pork Chops over medium high heat for 2-3 minutes on one side, then flip to other side and reduce heat to medium. Add onions, mushrooms and rosemary to pan. Sautee with pork chops for 2-3 minutes. Remove Pork chops from pan and place on a plate once they reach an internal temp of 150F. Add the garlic to the onion & mushroom mixture. Cook until onions and mushrooms are caramelized and garlic is fragrant. Deglaze the pan with the red wine making sure to scrape up any brown bits off the bottom of the pan (make sure you don’t burn anything during the cooking process as this will make the pan sauce bitter). Reduce the wine by half, then pour in the cream stirring to marry the flavors, then melt in the butter – being sure to stir continuously so that the sauce does not break. Taste and season with salt and pepper if necessary. Pour over the pork chops and enjoy!

DSC_8226.jpgScreen Shot 2017-01-19 at 3.54.42 PM.jpgScreen Shot 2017-01-19 at 3.55.06 PM.jpgScreen Shot 2017-01-19 at 3.56.10 PM.jpgScreen Shot 2017-01-19 at 3.57.13 PM.jpgBoneless Pork Chop Mushroom Red Wine -2.jpg

Pork Chops with Bacon and Kale

DSC_0107.jpg

This is a delicious and healthy quick dinner, plus, the cast-iron makes for minimal mess as this is a one pot kind of dish. Not only does it taste good, but there are a lot of health benefits to adding hearty dark greens like Kale as they are a nutritional powerhouse packed with calcium, fiber, vitamins and antioxidants (you can also substitute Swiss chard, mustard greens or even baby collards).

Ingredients – 2 White Oak Pastures Pastured Pork Rib Chops, 2 TBL Chopped Fresh Oregano, 1/2 tsp Ground Allspice, Salt & Pepper to taste, 1 TBL Olive Oil, 2 Bacon Slices- thick cut, sliced, 2 Garlic Cloves – minced, 1 Bunch of White Oak Pastures Organic Kale – stemmed and rough chopped, 5 tsp Sherry Wine vinegar, 1/2 Cup White Oak Pastures Poultry Bone Broth, 2 TBL Dijon Mustard 

Directions – Season Pork Chops with Oregano, Allspice, Salt & Pepper with a little olive oil. Allow to sit and marinate for 20-30 minutes. Sear over medium-high heat in a cast-iron pan, until golden brown. Once browned on both sides, remove chops to a plate and allow to rest.

Add Bacon to pan and sautee until crisp. Add Greens and begin to wilt. Sautee in garlic until fragrant. Deglaze with Sherry vinegar, and add Bone Broth. Simmer on low and mix in Dijon. Return Pork Chops to the pan and finish cooking to desired doneness or internal temperature reaches 145F. Serve and enjoy!

DSC_9859.jpgDSC_9911.jpgDSC_9945.jpgDSC_0036.jpgDSC_0029.jpgDSC_0041.jpgDSC_0060.jpgDSC_0064.jpg

Categories: Kitchen, Recipes, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | 4 Comments

How to cook a perfect pasture-raised turkey

We are grateful for the opportunity to provide you and your loved ones with a delicious pastured turkey for this special time of the year. Cooking a whole pasture-raised bird can be intimidating, and we want you to feel well-prepared to cook our turkeys this holiday season.

Our turkeys are athletes. They spend their entire lives roaming our lush pastures, hunting, pecking, scratching, and dustbathing as nature intended. Because of their diet and exercise, our birds are lean animals. When cooking them, keep in mind they have less fat than commodity turkeys. We have found that cooking with a wet, slow heat yields a more tender turkey dish.

Check out our recipe and tips to cook the perfect pastured turkey for your holiday meal, as well as our five-part video tutorial where Chef Reid walks you through the process step-by-step.

mortelliti_white_oak_pastures_lemon_herb_turkey-10-of-11

Ingredients

White Oak Pastures pastured turkey
White Oak Pastures pastured poultry bone broth or water
Olive oil
1 large onion
1 carrot
4 stalks celery
1 bay leaf

Butter Mixture Ingredients
10 oz butter (about 2.5 sticks) at room temp
4 tsp fresh rosemary
4 tsp fresh sage
1 tbsp fresh oregano
4 lemons (2 for juicing and zesting and 2 whole lemons)
3 fresh garlic cloves
¼ tsp allspice
Salt to taste
Black pepper to taste

Preparation

Receiving and Defrosting
Your turkey will arrive frozen or very cold to the touch. Allow 3-4 days to thaw your turkey slowly in the refrigerator. After the turkey thaws, remove the bag of giblets from the body cavity and set them aside. These are great for making gravy. There may be paper between the turkey breasts to soak up any juice; remove this, too.

Herb Butter Marinade
Combine butter mixture ingredients in a mixing bowl. Loosen the turkey’s skin with your hands, and rub the butter mixture over the whole turkey, under and over the skin. Tip: Use a piping bag to get the mixture under the skin more easily. If you have time, cover and refrigerate the bird overnight to allow the flavors time to penetrate the meat. We’ve found you don’t need to brine pastured birds because they hold moisture and flavor better than conventional birds.

Making Mirepox
Roughly chop celery, carrot, and onion and place them in the bottom of a roasting pan along with bone broth or water and a bay leaf. Use just enough liquid to cover the vegetables. This mixture will add flavor to the bird and keep it moist. Set aside a few pieces of onion for roasting inside the cavity of the turkey.

lemonherbturkeyprep-9462

Ready to cook
Remove turkey from refrigerator 30-60 minutes before cooking, and preheat oven to 325F. Place turkey on a roasting rack, breast up, and set in the roasting pan over the mirepox. Loosely place 2-4 lemon halves and a few pieces of onion inside the cavity. Truss the bird loosely with butcher’s twine and drizzle turkey skin with olive oil. Place the pan into the oven and cook, basting the bird with pan juices every 10-15 minutes. Remove the bird once the internal temperature of the thickest part of the thigh registers 160F (approximately 8-10 minutes per pound). Please note that our pastured turkeys cook more quickly than conventional birds. Lastly, it is important to allow the turkey to rest 15-20 minutes before carving so you don’t lose all the delicious juices.

Photos by Laura Mortelliti. 

Categories: Kitchen | Tags: | Leave a comment

We’ve got balls at White Oak Pastures

cows whimsical

Castration of male animals is a common practice in the livestock industry. Said to reduce aggression, the practice likely came about with the confinement of cattle in crowded conditions where the animals aren’t free to roam and express natural instinctive behaviors. As Will Harris says, you just can’t keep a bunch of bulls in confinement; it’s like the worst prison movie you’ve ever seen.

For over 100 years, White Oak Pastures castrated everything on this farm that wasn’t named Harris. It’s one of the practices we did away with in our transition to a kinder, gentler agriculture, in an effort to reduce the infliction of pain on the animals. Global Animal Partnership, Animal Welfare Approved, and Certified Humane all have thick manuals that detail what good animal welfare looks like. To meet the highest standards in these programs, we don’t perform any physical alterations on our animals, including castration, dehorning, or branding.

While the term ”bully” comes from the behavior of bulls, we don’t have a problem with aggressive bulls out on open pasture. If a big bad bull wants to bully a little bull, the little guy can just keep on walking. He has more incentive to get away than the big bull does to pick on him, and he has enough space to do so.

Fried Grassfed Beef Testicles Recipe

Our cattle are humanely processed in our on-farm abattoir. When our mature bulls are slaughtered, we offer grassfed beef testicles to our customers as part of our commitment to ensuring no part of the animal goes to waste. Sometimes called “Rocky Mountain oysters” or “cowboy caviar,” these are a unique and novel nose-to-tail treat. They are typically served fried as an appetizer, and would be a great surprise for your dinner guests or as a culinary adventure for yourself or your family.

This Harris family testicle recipe has been passed down through many generations. We hope you’ll give it a try and let us know what you think!

Ingredients
1 pack White Oak Pastures grassfed beef testicles
2 eggs
1 cup flour
Your choice of oil, for frying
Dash of salt and pepper
2 tbsp milk (optional)
Small handful of parsley for garnish (optional)
Ketchup or cocktail sauce for dipping

Preparation
Whisk eggs in a large bowl with milk, and in a separate large bowl season the flour with salt and pepper. Parboil the testicles in boiling water with a splash of salt for 1-2 minutes. Allow to cool. Peel the outer membrane from the testicles, and slice the testicles into medallions. Dip medallions in flour, then the egg mixture, then the flour again. Repeat this step for a thicker breading. Fry medallions in hot oil for several minutes, until crispy and brown. Remove from pan and allow to drain on paper towels.

Fried Bull Testis

Photo by Laura Mortelliti

Categories: Animal Welfare, Kitchen | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Grassfed goat is back in stock + lemon herb goat meatball recipe

Recently on our blog we’ve written about the power of browsing and land clearing through small ruminant animals. Meanwhile, grassfed goat has been out of stock in our online store for a while. We’ve been able to enjoy having our goats on the farm, but haven’t been able to share their goodness with you. Today we’re excited to have grassfed goat back in stock for our online shoppers, and to share Chef Reid’s delicious lemon herb goat meatball recipe!

Goat is the most widely consumed meat in the world, but we have less experience eating it here in the U.S. The tender, flavorful protein tastes similar to beef, but is a bit sweeter and slightly earthy. A great way to introduce goat to people for the first time is by making familiar foods like meatballs. This recipe is very easy to make, and takes just 15 minutes. Give our grassfed goat a try and let us know what you think!

Ingredients
1 pound White Oak Pastures ground goat
Handful of parsley, finely chopped
Handful of green onions, finely chopped
Handful of rosemary, finely chopped
1 egg
1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 tbsp. breadcrumbs
Juice of half a lemon
Dash of salt and pepper

Preparation
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Add all ingredients to a bowl and mix by hand. Form mixture into approximately 2 ounce meatballs and place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Bake at 425 degrees for 7 minutes.

Categories: Kitchen | Tags: | 3 Comments

How to roast a whole pastured chicken or guinea like a pro

Whole roasted chickenWhite Oak Pastures’ chickens and guineas live unconfined on pasture, hunting, pecking, scratching, and dust bathing. This leads to stronger, healthier, and in our opinion, tastier birds. It also means these birds use their muscles, and we need to take this into consideration when cooking a pasture raised animal. Apply some of the same principles we use when preparing grassfed beef, such as marinating or seasoning one to two days in advance to help tenderize those more active muscle fibers.

One of the easiest ways to cook a chicken or guinea is by slow roasting it. Cooking poultry with the bone in adds more flavor and nutrition to the meat and the broth you have left. We recommend the following recipe when roasting our pastured chickens and guineas.

Ingredients

1 White Oak Pastures small, medium or large chicken, or guinea
1 large onion – large chop
3 carrots – large chop
4 celery stalks – large chop
1 bay leaf
1 cup water
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup kosher salt
1 tbsp black pepper
1 tbsp garlic powder
1 tsp chili powder
½ tsp white pepper
1 tsp onion powder
¼ tsp allspice
2 tbsp dried oregano


Preparation

Place the onion, carrot celery, bay leaf and chicken or guinea in a roasting pan deep enough to cover with foil or a lid if using a Dutch oven or cast iron. Mix all spices and herbs together (kosher salt through oregano) in a bowl. You may have more than you need, but this is a good all-purpose seasoning to keep on hand. Pour the olive oil over the chicken and then rub the seasoning over the bird, making sure to get it under the skin and in the cavity so the flavors can penetrate the meat.

At this point, if you can let it marinate for about a day, it will help tenderize the bird as the salt begins to break down tougher muscle fibers. If you don’t have a day, just let it sit out covered at room temperature for about an hour before you put it in the oven.

Preheat oven to 325F. Add the 1 cup of water to the roasting pan. Cover with a lid or foil and place in middle rack of your oven. Roast a small chicken for 90-120 minutes; a medium chicken or a guinea for 140 minutes; and a large chicken for 140-170 minutes. Remove lid or foil. Caution: there will be hot steam, so be careful when removing the lid. Let the chicken rest for 10 minutes. Once the bird has cooled enough to handle, remove the meat and use in your favorite chicken salad recipe or anything else you’d like. Make sure you save the stock from the pan, as it’s a great base for soup and is highly nutritious.

Categories: Kitchen | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

How to buy grassfed and pastured meat in bulk

beef_eighth-cow_l

It used to be very common to buy a whole, half, or quarter of an animal from a farmer you know and trust, and then enjoy having a convenient, steady supply of protein in the freezer. This tradition of buying meat in bulk is making a comeback, and we’d like to make the process a little less intimidating and mysterious, and encourage you to give it a try.

One of the advantages of buying in bulk is the cost savings. Ethically-raised protein costs more to produce than factory farmed protein, but we are able to charge less for whole animals because we save money on packaging, marketing, and distribution. Here is how the cost breaks down: a whole cow is about 360 pounds of meat. At $2,799 for the cow, the cost comes out to $7.78 per pound, which is less than the cost of a pound of ground beef purchased by itself. When you buy the whole cow, you also get filets, ribeyes, strip steaks and more, all for $7.78 per pound.

Buying in bulk will also allow you to develop a deeper connection with your food and where it comes from. When you arrange to pick up your order on the farm, it is a great opportunity to schedule a tour to see where your animal was raised and processed. You’ll honor that animal every time you eat it, and take pride in learning how to prepare cuts of meat you may not have tried before.

You can purchase a quarter of a cow, an eighth of a cow, and a side (half) of lamb through our online store, where we also list which cuts come with each option. We will ship it to you in a cooler with dry ice, or you can pick up your order on the farm.

Whole and half cows and hogs can be purchased by filling out our order form and emailing or faxing it back to us. You have the option to choose the specifications of how the animal is butchered, and you can also choose to include the bones, fat, or offal. Shipping a whole or half cow or hog would be quite expensive, so we ask you to pick it up on the farm. Once you get it home, a whole cow will require a chest freezer totaling 14 cu. ft.; a side of beef or a whole hog should easily fit into a 7 cu. ft. model; and a side of pork will need about 3.5 cu. ft. of freezer space.

If you have any questions we haven’t answered here, please contact us at 229-641-2081 or info@whiteoakpastures.com.

Categories: Kitchen | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

How to make grassfed beef bone broth

At White Oak Pastures, we take pride in using every part of the animals we process, and broths are a way to utilize the strong, nutrient-dense bones. Check out Chef Reid’s easy how-to video and instructions for making beef bone broth at home. Enjoy this broth by itself as a rich, nourishing supplement or add it to soups and sauces for added flavor and nutrition.

Ingredients

  • 10 pounds White Oak Pastures grassfed beef bones. In this recipe, we used canoe, knuckle, marrow, oxtail, and rib bones, but choose any combination that you’d like.
  • 2 large onions, quartered
  • 3 medium-sized carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 5 stalks of celery, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar

Preparation

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Place bones in a large, shallow roasting pan. Bake bones 30-45 minutes, or until well browned, turning at the 15-minute mark. Remove from oven.

Move bones into a large pot. Pour 1/2 cup water into the roasting pan and use a wooden spatula to scrape up any fond (crusty browned bits). Add the fond mixture to the pot, then add onions, carrots, celery, bay leaves, and vinegar. Add water to cover the mixture and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 24-48 hours.

Over a large heatproof bowl, strain broth through a fine-mesh sieve, or a colandar lined with cheesecloth or 2 layers of paper towels. Remove bones, vegetables and seasoning.

Chill broth, then lift off the fat. Store fat in the refrigerator for 1 month, or freeze for 6 months to a year. Store broth in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, or freeze for 6 months to a year.

Categories: Kitchen | Tags: , , , | 4 Comments

How to prepare aged grassfed steaks

Our animals are athletes. They spend their entire lives roaming our lush pastures and eating sweet grasses, as nature intended. Because our cattle’s muscles see a lot of activity, we recommend aging our grassfed steaks to allow enzymes and microbes to break down the tissues to make the meat more tender and flavorful.

The wet aging process is as simple as keeping the vacuum-sealed steak in your refrigerator for 21 or more days. Aged grassfed steaks are also available for purchase in our online store.

Check out our new how-to video where Chef Reid demonstrates how to prepare our aged grassfed steaks without overcooking and losing all of the delicious flavor.

Categories: Kitchen | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

2015 Summer CSA – Week 16

This is an Even Week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Albany & Atlanta.

The tale of the humble Aubergine.

The eggplant is native to an area stretching from India, travelling through Southeast Asia and finishing in southern China. Wild varieties can still be found throughout the region. It is a prominent vegetable in Asia & India, even being referred to as the “King of vegetables” in India. This vegetable has long been loved in various cultures, and is slowly making its way into the hearts and produce sections of major grocers.

As a child, I can recall the shape and imagery of an Eggplant, but had never been introduced to its flesh until I was in my early twenties eating Eggplant Parmesan at a wedding. Crazy in retrospect. My next encounter was last summer, we grew it as a crop, and sent it weekly to CSA. Figuring, I would need to know how to store, prepare, and cook with these dynamic globes, I ventured into the Eggplant waters.

Eggplant can be daunting if you are unfamiliar with it as I was.

Working with Aubergines:

*The fruit bitters over time, use it as freshly as possible.

*Salting is the key to removing excess moisture. Stuffing, and frying benefit from pre salting. When salting, cut the fruit into the desired shape (crosswise, lengthwise, disks, etc.), then spread a thin even layer of salt over the surface of the flesh, (allow to sit on a cutting board with paper towel, or in a colander over the sink. After 15-20min, remove the remaining salt using a towel to wipe it off.

*They develop a wonderful sweetness when roasted, (think how garlic changes when its roasted).

* Seeds & Skin are edible.

Attention!

Two Fruits this Share!!! This week you will find two fruits in your share, depending on harvest you will find two of the following fruits: Apples, black berries, Watermelon, & Cantaloupe. This means there could be 2 cantaloupes, OR cantaloupe & apples, OR Watermelon & Cantaloupe, etc. Two Fruit shares will be in the CSA share this week!

Some Recipes to get you started, complements of Tim, from our Garden Crew. These are a few of his favorites linked to eggplant, try one of these this week!

Sweet Corn Polenta with Eggplant Sauce

From Plenty by Yotam OttoLenghi (Serves 4)

Eggplant Sauce: ◊ 2/3 cup vegetable oil ◊ 1 medium eggplant, cut into ¾ in. dice ◊ 2 tsp tomato paste ◊ ¼ cup white wine ◊ 1 cup chopped peeled tomatoes (fresh or canned) ◊ 6 ½ tbsp water ◊ ¼ tsp salt ◊ ¼ tsp sugar ◊ 1 tbsp chopped oregano

Polenta: ◊ 6 ears corn ◊ 2 ¼ cups water ◊ 3 tbsp butter, diced ◊ 7 oz. feta crumbled ◊ ¼ tsp salt ◊ black pepper to taste

Eggplant Sauce Directions:

Step 1:        Heat oil in a large saucepan and fry eggplant on medium heat for about 15 minutes, or until nicely brown. Drain off as much oil as you can and discard it. Add tomato paste to the pan and stir with the eggplant. Cook for a couple of minutes, add wine and cook for 1 more minute. Add the chopped tomatoes, water, salt, sugar and oregano and cook for 5 more minutes. Set aside and warm when needed.

Polenta Directions:

Step1:         Remove leaves and “silk” from corn, chop off pointed end and stalk. Stand each ear upright on its base and use a sharp knife to shave off the kernels. You want to have 1 ¼ lb of kernels.

Step 2:        Place the kernels in a medium saucepan and cover them with the water. Cook for 12 minutes on a low simmer. Use a slotted spoon to lift the kernels from the water and into a food processor; reserve the cooking liquid. Process them for quite a few minutes to break as much of the kernel case as possible. Add some of the cooking liquid if the mixture becomes too dry to process.

Step 3:        Return the corn paste to the pan with the cooking liquid and cook, while stirring, on low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the mixture thickens to a mashed potato consistency. Fold in the butter, feta, slat and some pepper and cook for 2 more minutes. Taste and add more salt if needed.

Step 4:        Divide among shallow bowls and spoon warm eggplant sauce in the center.

Fried Eggplant

The Gift of Southern Cooking By Scott Peacock and Edna Lewis

Ingredients: ◊ 1 Large or 2 medium eggplant ◊ Kosher salt ◊ 1 egg, lightly beaten ◊ 1/3 cup buttermilk ◊ ¾ cup fine-ground white cornmeal ◊ 2 tbsp cornstarch ◊ ¾ tsp salt ◊ ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper ◊ oil for frying (vegetable, canola or peanut)

Directions:

Step 1:        Remove the stem end from eggplant. Cut eggplant lengthwise into 1/3 in. slices. If eggplant is large cut it crosswise. Sprinkle the slices generously on both sides with kosher salt, and place in a colander to drain for 20 minutes.

Step 2:        Meanwhile, whisk together the egg and buttermilk in a shallow dish. Mix cornmeal, cornstarch, ¾ tsp salt and freshly ground black pepper on a piece of wax paper.

Step 3:        When the eggplant has finished draining, press the slices between 2 layers of pepper towel to remove any excess moisture. Heat 1 in. of oil in a heavy skillet until very hot, but not smoking – 350 F. Dip eggplant slices first in egg and drain off any excess; then dredge each slice carefully in the cornmeal mixture, making sure that it is completely coated and patting off any excess.

Step 4:        Fry eggplant in batches until it is crisp and a rich golden brown, 2-3 minutes on the first side and about 1 minute on the other. Remove the slices from the pan, allowing oil to drain from the slices into the pan before transferring to crumpled paper towels or a draining rack to drain further. Sprinkle lightly with salt and freshly ground pepper and serve immediately.

EGGPLANT STUFFED WITH SUMMER VEGETABLES

Frank Stitt’s Southern Table (Serves 4)

Ingredients: ◊ 2 eggplant cut lengthwise in half ◊ Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste ◊ 1 ½ tsp olive oil ◊ 1 medium onion finely diced ◊ 2 galic cloves, finely chopped ◊ 2 zucchini, 1 shredded, 1 finely diced ◊ 1 cup cremini or button mushrooms, trimmed and finely diced ◊ 1 tomato, seeded and cut into medium dice ◊ ½ bunch flat-leaf parsley, leaves removed and chopped ◊ ½ bunch basil, leaves removed and chopped ◊ ½ cup medium coarse bread crumbs

Directions:

Step 1:        With a sturdy spoon, scoop the flesh out of each eggplant half, leaving ¼ in. thick shells; reserve the shells. Sprinkle the inside of the shells with salt, invert onto a plate and let stand for 30 minutes. Dice the flesh and set aside.

Step 2: Preheat oven to 350

Step 3: Turn the eggplant shells over, pat dry and place on a baking sheet. Bake until softened, about 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Leave the oven on.

Step 4: Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté until tender, 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, diced eggplant, zucchini and mushrooms and sauté until the mushrooms begin to soften, about 3 minutes. Add the tomato, parsley, basil and bread crumbs; stir to combine and season with salt and pepper. Remove from heat.

Step 5: Fill the baked eggplant shells with the vegetable stuffing mounding it loosely. Bake for 20 minutes; serve hot.

RATATOUILLE

The Art of Simple Food

By Alice Waters (Serves 6-8)

For a colorful ratatouille use different colored peppers, squash and tomatoes. Don’t hesitate to double this recipe, as any ratatouille is better the next day.

Ingredients: ◊ 1 medium eggplant cut into ½ in. cubes ◊ kosher salt ◊ 4 Tbs olive oil ◊ 2 medium onions cut into ½ in. dice ◊ 4 to 6 cloves garlic, chopped ◊ ½ bunch basil tied in a bouquet with kitchen twine ◊ 6 leaves basil, chopped ◊ A pinch of dried chili flakes ◊ 2 sweet peppers, cut into ½ in. dice◊ 3 medium summer squash, cut into ½ in. dice ◊ 3 ripe medium tomatoes, cut into ½ in. dice ◊ Extra virgin olive oil to finish

Directions:

Step 1:        Toss eggplant cubes with salt, set in a colander and let drain for about 20 minutes. Heat 2 Tbs Olive oil in a heavy bottomed pot. Pat the eggplant dry, add to the pan and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until golden. Add a bit more oil if eggplant absorbs all the oil and sticks to the bottom of the pan. Remove eggplant when done and set aside.

Step 2:        Pour in 2 more Tbs olive oil and add onions. Cook for about 7 minutes, or until soft and translucent. Add garlic and basil bouquet a pinch of salt and dried chili flakes. Cook for 2-3 minutes, then stir in the sweet peppers, cook for a few more minutes then add the squash. Cook for a few more minutes and add tomatoes. Cook for 10 minutes longer, then stir in the eggplant and cook for 10-15 minutes more until all the vegetables are soft. Remove the bouquet of basil, pressing on it to extract all its flavors, and adjust the seasoning with salt.

Step 3:        Stir in chopped basil and extra virgin olive oil to taste. Serve warm or cold.

Attention!

Two Fruits this Share!!! This week you will find two fruits in your share, depending on harvest you will find two of the following fruits: Apples, black berries, Watermelon, & Cantaloupe. This means there could be 2 cantaloupes, OR cantaloupe & apples, OR Watermelon & Cantaloupe, etc. Two Fruit shares will be in the CSA share this week!

Organic Share List:

Eggplant (Aubergine): baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Sage: Brown butter dishes, Brussels Sprouts, pasta, potatoes, rich & creamy dishes, roasted squash, sausage,

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Cucumbers OR Squash: (Squash) bake, blacken, fry, grill, and roast, sauté, stuffed, (cukes) raw, pickled, salads, soups, & sandwiches.

Storage: Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, dry off & place in crisper drawer.

Bunching Onions OR Leeks: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: in the crisper drawer wrapped in a damp towel, or on the counter is a shallow dish of water.

Hot Peppers: blackened, marinade, pickled, salsa, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Sweet Peppers (Bell or Swt. Roasting): blackened, fresh, grilled, kabob, pepper jelly, raw, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Cut Flowers: Be Creative! (3Stems each)

Dill Flowers: Used for pickling: carrots, jalapenos, green beans, cabbage, fennel, green tomatoes, swiss chard stems, okra, and so many other vinegar favorites.

Storage: keep in glass of water, like fresh flowers, use quickly.

TWO of the Following: Cantaloupe, Watermelon, blackberries, Apples.

braised, garnish, gelato, popsicles, tart.

Storage: (melons) Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, then remove rind, cut into cubes or slices and store in the fridge.

Okra OR Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled. (okra): baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Remove from bag, store in a container with a damp cloth covering the beans, close lid slightly. (okra) Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!Beets OR Cabbage OR Carrots:

Beets OR Cabbage OR Carrots:braised, candied, cupcakes, juiced, pickled, roasted, smashed (cabbage) braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps.

Storage: (carrots & Beets) Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops. (Cabbage)Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Categories: CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), Kitchen | Tags: | Leave a comment

Spring CSA 2015 – Week 13

***This is an ODD week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Bluffton (On-Farm), Columbus, Dothan, & Tallahassee.

Low rumbles from nearby thunderstorms surround the farm today. It gives this feeling of anticipation. Waiting for the sudden storm, the refreshing rain, and the cool breeze. Small storm clouds swirl around the little town of Bluffton. As tiny droplets tap on your roofs, windows and cars listen intently. It is one of the sweetest sounds on earth.

This share is bursting with a unique array of goods from the farm. These are things that sounded good to me this share.

Perfect Pairings:

Roasted Beets & Hot Peppers, tossed with Basil & feta.

Green Tomato & Swiss Chard soup topped with blackened Bunching Onions.

Onion, Carrot, Hot Pepper, Chard Stem, Bunching Onion & Cabbage stir-fry!

….and these are wonderful sounding dishes from the interwebs:

Green Tomato Pasta Sauce

Moroccan Roasted Carrot & Eggplant Quinoa Salad

New this share: Squash & Hot Peppers!

This is the first appearance of peppers & squash of the season! Soon other varieties of both squash (zucchini, patty pan, rhonde de nice), and peppers (sweet roasting, bell) will be ready for harvest and pack into your shares! Be on the lookout for more interesting items to come!

Organic Share Items

Squash: bake, blacken, fry, grill, and roast, sauté, stuffed,

Storage: Store in plastic wrap, or in plastic storage bag with all of the air removed.

Hot Peppers: blackened, marinade, pickled, salsa, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Bunching Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Storage: Remove rubber band, wrap bulbs in damp paper towel.

Eggplant: baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, and vegetarian cutlets

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Baby Carrots: candied, juiced, muffins, raw, salad, steamed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Basil: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Purple, Yellow OR Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled.

Storage: Remove from bag, store in a container with a damp cloth covering the beans, close lid slightly.

Tomatoes Green: blackened, burgers, canned, cocktails, jams, salad, salsa, sandwich, sautéed, sliced, stuffed, soup/stew. Green (chutney, fried, pickled, sandwiches, salsa.)

Storage: Ripe(counter, windowsill, paper bag), Green(fridge)

Onions: braised, jams, pickled, roasted, stuffed,

Storage: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Beets: braised, candied, cupcakes, juiced, pickled, roasted, smashed

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Cabbage: braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Swiss Chard: braise, pesto, pickling (stems), raw, salads, stir-fry, sautéed, wraps.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Categories: CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), Kitchen | Tags: | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.