2015 SUmmer CSA – Week 20

This is an even week Therefore we will be delivering half shares to Atlanta & Albany!

Sweltering. A term defined as uncomfortably hot. If you have spent any time outdoors lately this term has probably lingered in your mind, like the sweat lingers on your brow. Take a few moments to think about all of the people who make a living spending their time in the elements. All of our cowboys, animal caretakers, our garden crew along with egg collectors, not to mention all of the animals that spend their entire lives outside. It is a wonderful and crazy thought. We have the opportunity to work in an environment that allows us to work outside in all seasons, there is no way that we could cultivate crops in the dead winter in Michigan. Our animals also are allowed to live all of their days under the sun and moon. When we receive heavy rainfall I always worry for the cattle and poultry but they follow their natural instinct and take cover, whereas our hogs love to wallow in the mud and puddles that heavy storms create.

This may be an extreme heat wave, and the heat advisory has been posted for over a week now, but there is something that stirs in me when I break a sweat. The heat reminds us of our limitations, as well as our frailty. Many of our crops die out because of the extreme heat of the summer, it reminds us of seasonality, and not all crops grow at all times in a region. We are dictated by the climates in which we live. Seeing asparagus in the grocery in July makes me chuckle almost as much as seeing tomatoes in January.

If we are to eat locally, then we must eat seasonally.

Our region has its own unique climate, and in order to support our local cultivators we need to get back into the rhythm of eating what is in season in your area. I will admit, when it comes to fruits it is so hard to eat locally and seasonally because it is so easy to find berries all year round, but they never taste as sweet as when they are freshly picked and eaten within a few moments, hours or days after they were picked. We sacrifice taste, fossil fuels, and our local farms when we don’t consider what is in season. Lucky for us we only a have a few more weeks of the sweltering heat, and new fall crops have started sprouting in our greenhouse. So if you are dying for a crisp salad or some kale chips they are just a few months around the corner. The next season will be here in no time.

Organic Share List:

Organic Transplants: Zinnias, Lemon Balm, Rosemary, Comfrey, Stevia, Chives, & Sage: These little bundles of plant life are ready to be planted into a container or your yard! They are in peat pots and are ready to be transplanted at your home. We recommend that you tear the upper rim off of the pot, so that it is level with the soil. This peat rim wicks away moisture and will dry out your newly planted herb/flower. You can also make a tear in the bottom of the pot to encourage root growth into its new home. The size of the container you choose will determine the size of the plant, you can always upgrade containers later.

Potatoes: baked, braised, mashed, baked fries, dumplings, soup, bread, wedges, latkes, the possibilities are endless.

Storage: Store unwashed, in a dark cool location. Not the fridge.

Sweet Potato Greens: Salad, juiced, raw, steamed, sauteed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Eggplant (Aubergine): baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets.

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Hot Peppers: blackened, fresh, grilled, kabob, pepper jelly, raw, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Muscadine OR Pears OR Figs OR Microgreens: fresh, frozen, marinades, juices, braised, fruit butters, and even enjoyed on fresh salads. (corn) chutneys, slaws, salsas, raw, grilled, paired with grassfed butter!

Storage: (Figs) Store in a single layer on a plate lined with a paper towel. (Pears) Okra: baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Oregano: marinade, rub, savory bread rolls, beans, burger seasoning.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Garlic: Salsa, roasted, marinade, dressing, aioli, mashed potatoes,

Storage: Cool Dry location, (in a bowl on the counter).

Fennel: braised, raw salads, risotto, roasted, stews & soups

Storage: Short term storage- in a shallow dish of water on the counter. Long term storage- place in an air tight container with a little water.

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2015 Summer CSA – Week 19

***This is an ODD week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Bluffton (On-Farm), Columbus, Dothan, & Tallahassee.

Good Morning from south south Georgia, where the sunrises and sets on open pasture land. As the temperature rises the heat pressure is visible on all things living. We sweat and toil, the plants wilt in the late afternoon, the only thing with vigor when the sun comes out are the gnats. If you have ever spent any time south of the gnat line you know what I mean.

Lucky for us there are a few heat resilient plants that thrive in the heat: peppers, eggplant, and okra. These troopers will carry us through the heat of the summer and into the coolness of the fall. If you haven’t found a way to love these vegetables, I would recommend you finding a way to truly enjoy them. Think outside the box, or think back to the basics. There is a lovely recipe collection that was loaned to me from a former CSA member called “Plenty”, in which vegetables are embraced for what they are and not forced to into things that aren’t. The author Ottolenghi, does a wonderful job of playing to the strength of the vegetables that he is working with. I would recommend falling in love with the summer trio, find new recipes and rediscover old favorites.

Announcement: Our Summer 2 Week Break Will Begin the Week of August 17th and goes through August 29th. We will resume delivering CSA shares on Wednesday September 3rd.

Organic Share List:

Potatoes: baked, braised, mashed, baked fries, dumplings, soup, bread, wedges, latkes, the possibilities are endless.

Storage: Store unwashed, in a dark cool location. Not the fridge.

Sweet Potato Greens: Salad, juiced, raw, steamed, sauteed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Eggplant (Aubergine): baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets.

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Sweet OR Hot Peppers (Bell or Swt. Roasting): blackened, fresh, grilled, kabob, pepper jelly, raw, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Cantaloupe OR Watermelon OR Pears: tarts, braised, frozen, smoothies, popsicles, paired with feta.

Storage: (melons) Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, then remove rind, cut into cubes or slices and store in the fridge.

Figs OR Microgreens: fresh, frozen, marinades, juices, braised, fruit butters, and even enjoyed on fresh salads. (corn) chutneys, slaws, salsas, raw, grilled, paired with grassfed butter!

Storage: (Figs) Store in a single layer on a plate lined with a paper towel. (Pears) Okra: baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Baby Roasting Cabbage OR Bunching Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: in the crisper drawer wrapped in a damp towel, or on the counter is a shallow dish of water.

Sage OR Mint: Brown butter dishes, Brussels Sprouts, pasta, potatoes, rich & creamy dishes, roasted squash, sausage,

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Rosemary: Breads, cocktail, herb marinade, olive oil infusions, lamb, pasta, pork, potatoes, poultry

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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2015 Summer CSA – Week 18

This is an Even Week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Albany & Atlanta.

Announcement: Our Summer 2 Week Break Will Begin the Week of August 17th and goes through August 29th. We will resume delivering CSA shares on Wednesday September 3rd.

This week is one of reflection, two pillars in our community have moved on and are striking out in a new direction. Miss Lori Moshman & Sir Frankie Darsey will be celebrated in memory, and thought of often. Lori will pursue her graduate degree, while Frankie uses his diverse skillsets to enhance the next flock that he tends.

Many of you were here when they started out in the Organic garden; planting, cultivating, harvesting and representing us at the Columbus market. They started as interns and evolved into cornerstones of the organism that comprises White Oak. If ever you have tasted a delectable vegetable from our gardens, it was because Lori sowed the seeds that bore the harvest. For those of you out there that have indulged in an egg, or even a chicken, turkey, guinea, goose, duck or rabbit you have done so because of the bird whisperer that is Mr. Darsey.

Mushrooms, honey, black soldier flies and even workshops started under the creative care of Lori, she will be sorely missed. Her quick witticisms and knowledge made for an interesting conversation every time you entered the greenhouse. The educational programs that we offer, were brought to life under her watch, many in our CSA community have benefited from her understanding of the secret lives of plants, and insects.

Many monsoon nights you would find Frankie, scurrying around from coop to coop checking his flock and making sure they were safe from the storm. I have never met a more dedicated man or caretaker. Passion, knowledge and a sense of purpose will forever characterize Frankie in our minds and hearts.

Frankie & Lori,

We wish you a fulfilled life, brimming with new experiences, projects, and memories. You will be with us in thought & purpose.

Organic Share List:

Potatoes: baked, braised, mashed, baked fries, dumplings, soup, bread, wedges, latkes, the possibilities are endless.

Storage: Store unwashed, in a dark cool location. Not the fridge.

Sweet Potato Greens: Salad, juiced, raw, steamed, sauteed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Eggplant (Aubergine): baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets.

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Hot Peppers: blackened, marinade, pickled, salsa, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Sweet Peppers (Bell or Swt. Roasting): blackened, fresh, grilled, kabob, pepper jelly, raw, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Cantaloupe OR Watermelon: tarts, braised, frozen, smoothies, popsicles, paired with feta.

Storage: (melons) Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, then remove rind, cut into cubes or slices and store in the fridge.

Figs OR Pears: fresh, frozen, marinades, juices, braised, fruit butters, and even enjoyed on fresh salads. (corn) chutneys, slaws, salsas, raw, grilled, paired with grassfed butter!

Storage: (Figs) Store in a single layer on a plate lined with a paper towel. (Pears) Okra: baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Sage: Brown butter dishes, Brussels Sprouts, pasta, potatoes, rich & creamy dishes, roasted squash, sausage,

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Rosemary: Breads, cocktail, herb marinade, olive oil infusions, lamb, pasta, pork, potatoes, poultry

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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2015 Summer CSA – Week 17

***This is an ODD week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Bluffton (On-Farm), Columbus, Dothan, & Tallahassee.

Week 17 is bursting with loads of fresh garden treats, it is also the bittersweet half way point between the CSA Season. Can you believe that we made it half way already? This season has brought new members to our staff as well as new members to our CSA family. Take a few moments to think of your favorite recipes of the season, your favorite share of the season, and your favorite unique creation.

Announcement: Our Summer 2 Week Break Will Begin the Week of August 17th and goes through August 29th.

We will resume delivering CSA shares on Wednesday September 3rd.

In this portion of southern Georgia our crops die back due to the heat, this also gives us the chance to change gears and start moving towards our fall crops.

New this Share: Pears, Figs, Potatoes, Sweet Corn

Pears: This variety is firm, subtly sweet, and known for canning and baking. We are sending them to you firm & under ripe so that you can choose your application. A pear is ideally ripe when the portion around the stem is slightly soft to the touch. These pears are not ideal for eating fresh, we should have some later in the season that are a fresh eating variety.

Figs: These beauties are sweet and fragrant, each bite extrudes a conversation in your brain. They can be enjoyed fresh, braised, caramelized, poached as well as other decadent applications. Be sure to enjoy quickly, they are a short lived gift of the summer.

Potatoes: Our first potato dig of the season just occurred! There are more secrets concealed by the earth awaiting to be dug up. As the season progresses we hope to have a steady supply of spuds.

Sweet Corn: An experiment for our garden, this was the first season that sweet corn has been planted since I have arrived. The rain has stunted many of the ears, however those that are still thriving are perfectly sweet.

Perfect Pairings:

Mint & Watermelon Juice: Cube watermelon & remove the basil leaves from their stem, pass it through a juicer and enjoy.

Watermelon, Basil & Feta Salad: cube watermelon, chop basil, and break apart feta. Toss together and enjoy.

Pears, Hot pepper, Sweet Corn, Crema & Lime Salad: So weird, so good. Dice pears & hot peppers, cut corn away from its cob, combine all veggies in bowl. Add in a dollop of Crema and half a lime juice. Salt & pepper to taste. This is sooooo good on tacos with fresh micro greens and red onions.

Cucumber & Mint Water: Cut a few disks of cucumber, bruise a leaf or two between your fingers and toss in with your daily water.

Deconstructed Stuffed Peppers: Sweet Roasting or Bell peppers, eggplant, hot peppers, onions, basil, & Okra. Dice all ingredients, except for the sweet peppers, allow the onion to sweat on the stove than add in all other diced veggies. Season to your preferences (tomato paste, cumin, garlic, cayenne, paprika, curry, etc.). Fold in cooked rice, quinoa, cuscus or preferred grain (this step optional). Once you have created the stuffing of your dreams you can serve two ways! Option 1: blacken the peppers on the grill, stove or oven, serve the peppers alongside the stuffing and stuff as you go. Option 2: Leave the sweet peppers uncooked and serve alongside the stuffing, this option gives you the undeniable crunch of a fresh pepper.

Organic Share List:

Potatoes: baked, braised, mashed, baked fries, dumplings, soup, bread, wedges, latkes, the possibilities are endless.

Storage: Store unwashed, in a dark cool location. Not the fridge.

Sweet Potato Greens: Salad, juiced, raw, steamed, sauteed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Eggplant (Aubergine): baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets.

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Mint: butter mints, chickpea salad, chutney, coolers, cocktails, Feta-watermelon salads, grain salad, infused waters, pesto, smoothie, simple syrup, sorbet, tea, & yogurt dip.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Basil: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Cucumbers OR Squash: (Squash) bake, blacken, fry, grill, and roast, sauté, stuffed, (cukes) raw, pickled, salads, soups, & sandwiches.

Storage: Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, dry off & place in crisper drawer.

Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Hot Peppers: blackened, marinade, pickled, salsa, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Sweet Peppers (Bell or Swt. Roasting): blackened, fresh, grilled, kabob, pepper jelly, raw, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Cantaloupe OR Watermelon: tarts, braised, frozen, smoothies, popsicles, paired with feta.

Storage: (melons) Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, then remove rind, cut into cubes or slices and store in the fridge.

Figs OR Blackberries OR Sweet Corn: fresh, frozen, marinades, juices, braised, fruit butters, and even enjoyed on fresh salads. (corn) chutneys, slaws, salsas, raw, grilled, paired with grassfed butter!

Storage: (Figs & Blackberries) Store in a single layer on a plate lined with a paper towel. (Corn) Store in the fridge with husk, use quickly! Or cut from the cob and store in the freezer.

Okra OR Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled. (okra): baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Pears: tarts, braised, poached, juiced, canned, pickled, pear butter.

Storage: Keep in fridge until ready to use.

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2015 Summer CSA – Week 16

This is an Even Week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Albany & Atlanta.

The tale of the humble Aubergine.

The eggplant is native to an area stretching from India, travelling through Southeast Asia and finishing in southern China. Wild varieties can still be found throughout the region. It is a prominent vegetable in Asia & India, even being referred to as the “King of vegetables” in India. This vegetable has long been loved in various cultures, and is slowly making its way into the hearts and produce sections of major grocers.

As a child, I can recall the shape and imagery of an Eggplant, but had never been introduced to its flesh until I was in my early twenties eating Eggplant Parmesan at a wedding. Crazy in retrospect. My next encounter was last summer, we grew it as a crop, and sent it weekly to CSA. Figuring, I would need to know how to store, prepare, and cook with these dynamic globes, I ventured into the Eggplant waters.

Eggplant can be daunting if you are unfamiliar with it as I was.

Working with Aubergines:

*The fruit bitters over time, use it as freshly as possible.

*Salting is the key to removing excess moisture. Stuffing, and frying benefit from pre salting. When salting, cut the fruit into the desired shape (crosswise, lengthwise, disks, etc.), then spread a thin even layer of salt over the surface of the flesh, (allow to sit on a cutting board with paper towel, or in a colander over the sink. After 15-20min, remove the remaining salt using a towel to wipe it off.

*They develop a wonderful sweetness when roasted, (think how garlic changes when its roasted).

* Seeds & Skin are edible.

Attention!

Two Fruits this Share!!! This week you will find two fruits in your share, depending on harvest you will find two of the following fruits: Apples, black berries, Watermelon, & Cantaloupe. This means there could be 2 cantaloupes, OR cantaloupe & apples, OR Watermelon & Cantaloupe, etc. Two Fruit shares will be in the CSA share this week!

Some Recipes to get you started, complements of Tim, from our Garden Crew. These are a few of his favorites linked to eggplant, try one of these this week!

Sweet Corn Polenta with Eggplant Sauce

From Plenty by Yotam OttoLenghi (Serves 4)

Eggplant Sauce: ◊ 2/3 cup vegetable oil ◊ 1 medium eggplant, cut into ¾ in. dice ◊ 2 tsp tomato paste ◊ ¼ cup white wine ◊ 1 cup chopped peeled tomatoes (fresh or canned) ◊ 6 ½ tbsp water ◊ ¼ tsp salt ◊ ¼ tsp sugar ◊ 1 tbsp chopped oregano

Polenta: ◊ 6 ears corn ◊ 2 ¼ cups water ◊ 3 tbsp butter, diced ◊ 7 oz. feta crumbled ◊ ¼ tsp salt ◊ black pepper to taste

Eggplant Sauce Directions:

Step 1:        Heat oil in a large saucepan and fry eggplant on medium heat for about 15 minutes, or until nicely brown. Drain off as much oil as you can and discard it. Add tomato paste to the pan and stir with the eggplant. Cook for a couple of minutes, add wine and cook for 1 more minute. Add the chopped tomatoes, water, salt, sugar and oregano and cook for 5 more minutes. Set aside and warm when needed.

Polenta Directions:

Step1:         Remove leaves and “silk” from corn, chop off pointed end and stalk. Stand each ear upright on its base and use a sharp knife to shave off the kernels. You want to have 1 ¼ lb of kernels.

Step 2:        Place the kernels in a medium saucepan and cover them with the water. Cook for 12 minutes on a low simmer. Use a slotted spoon to lift the kernels from the water and into a food processor; reserve the cooking liquid. Process them for quite a few minutes to break as much of the kernel case as possible. Add some of the cooking liquid if the mixture becomes too dry to process.

Step 3:        Return the corn paste to the pan with the cooking liquid and cook, while stirring, on low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the mixture thickens to a mashed potato consistency. Fold in the butter, feta, slat and some pepper and cook for 2 more minutes. Taste and add more salt if needed.

Step 4:        Divide among shallow bowls and spoon warm eggplant sauce in the center.

Fried Eggplant

The Gift of Southern Cooking By Scott Peacock and Edna Lewis

Ingredients: ◊ 1 Large or 2 medium eggplant ◊ Kosher salt ◊ 1 egg, lightly beaten ◊ 1/3 cup buttermilk ◊ ¾ cup fine-ground white cornmeal ◊ 2 tbsp cornstarch ◊ ¾ tsp salt ◊ ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper ◊ oil for frying (vegetable, canola or peanut)

Directions:

Step 1:        Remove the stem end from eggplant. Cut eggplant lengthwise into 1/3 in. slices. If eggplant is large cut it crosswise. Sprinkle the slices generously on both sides with kosher salt, and place in a colander to drain for 20 minutes.

Step 2:        Meanwhile, whisk together the egg and buttermilk in a shallow dish. Mix cornmeal, cornstarch, ¾ tsp salt and freshly ground black pepper on a piece of wax paper.

Step 3:        When the eggplant has finished draining, press the slices between 2 layers of pepper towel to remove any excess moisture. Heat 1 in. of oil in a heavy skillet until very hot, but not smoking – 350 F. Dip eggplant slices first in egg and drain off any excess; then dredge each slice carefully in the cornmeal mixture, making sure that it is completely coated and patting off any excess.

Step 4:        Fry eggplant in batches until it is crisp and a rich golden brown, 2-3 minutes on the first side and about 1 minute on the other. Remove the slices from the pan, allowing oil to drain from the slices into the pan before transferring to crumpled paper towels or a draining rack to drain further. Sprinkle lightly with salt and freshly ground pepper and serve immediately.

EGGPLANT STUFFED WITH SUMMER VEGETABLES

Frank Stitt’s Southern Table (Serves 4)

Ingredients: ◊ 2 eggplant cut lengthwise in half ◊ Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste ◊ 1 ½ tsp olive oil ◊ 1 medium onion finely diced ◊ 2 galic cloves, finely chopped ◊ 2 zucchini, 1 shredded, 1 finely diced ◊ 1 cup cremini or button mushrooms, trimmed and finely diced ◊ 1 tomato, seeded and cut into medium dice ◊ ½ bunch flat-leaf parsley, leaves removed and chopped ◊ ½ bunch basil, leaves removed and chopped ◊ ½ cup medium coarse bread crumbs

Directions:

Step 1:        With a sturdy spoon, scoop the flesh out of each eggplant half, leaving ¼ in. thick shells; reserve the shells. Sprinkle the inside of the shells with salt, invert onto a plate and let stand for 30 minutes. Dice the flesh and set aside.

Step 2: Preheat oven to 350

Step 3: Turn the eggplant shells over, pat dry and place on a baking sheet. Bake until softened, about 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Leave the oven on.

Step 4: Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté until tender, 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, diced eggplant, zucchini and mushrooms and sauté until the mushrooms begin to soften, about 3 minutes. Add the tomato, parsley, basil and bread crumbs; stir to combine and season with salt and pepper. Remove from heat.

Step 5: Fill the baked eggplant shells with the vegetable stuffing mounding it loosely. Bake for 20 minutes; serve hot.

RATATOUILLE

The Art of Simple Food

By Alice Waters (Serves 6-8)

For a colorful ratatouille use different colored peppers, squash and tomatoes. Don’t hesitate to double this recipe, as any ratatouille is better the next day.

Ingredients: ◊ 1 medium eggplant cut into ½ in. cubes ◊ kosher salt ◊ 4 Tbs olive oil ◊ 2 medium onions cut into ½ in. dice ◊ 4 to 6 cloves garlic, chopped ◊ ½ bunch basil tied in a bouquet with kitchen twine ◊ 6 leaves basil, chopped ◊ A pinch of dried chili flakes ◊ 2 sweet peppers, cut into ½ in. dice◊ 3 medium summer squash, cut into ½ in. dice ◊ 3 ripe medium tomatoes, cut into ½ in. dice ◊ Extra virgin olive oil to finish

Directions:

Step 1:        Toss eggplant cubes with salt, set in a colander and let drain for about 20 minutes. Heat 2 Tbs Olive oil in a heavy bottomed pot. Pat the eggplant dry, add to the pan and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until golden. Add a bit more oil if eggplant absorbs all the oil and sticks to the bottom of the pan. Remove eggplant when done and set aside.

Step 2:        Pour in 2 more Tbs olive oil and add onions. Cook for about 7 minutes, or until soft and translucent. Add garlic and basil bouquet a pinch of salt and dried chili flakes. Cook for 2-3 minutes, then stir in the sweet peppers, cook for a few more minutes then add the squash. Cook for a few more minutes and add tomatoes. Cook for 10 minutes longer, then stir in the eggplant and cook for 10-15 minutes more until all the vegetables are soft. Remove the bouquet of basil, pressing on it to extract all its flavors, and adjust the seasoning with salt.

Step 3:        Stir in chopped basil and extra virgin olive oil to taste. Serve warm or cold.

Attention!

Two Fruits this Share!!! This week you will find two fruits in your share, depending on harvest you will find two of the following fruits: Apples, black berries, Watermelon, & Cantaloupe. This means there could be 2 cantaloupes, OR cantaloupe & apples, OR Watermelon & Cantaloupe, etc. Two Fruit shares will be in the CSA share this week!

Organic Share List:

Eggplant (Aubergine): baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, & vegetarian cutlets

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Sage: Brown butter dishes, Brussels Sprouts, pasta, potatoes, rich & creamy dishes, roasted squash, sausage,

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Cucumbers OR Squash: (Squash) bake, blacken, fry, grill, and roast, sauté, stuffed, (cukes) raw, pickled, salads, soups, & sandwiches.

Storage: Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, dry off & place in crisper drawer.

Bunching Onions OR Leeks: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store: in the crisper drawer wrapped in a damp towel, or on the counter is a shallow dish of water.

Hot Peppers: blackened, marinade, pickled, salsa, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Sweet Peppers (Bell or Swt. Roasting): blackened, fresh, grilled, kabob, pepper jelly, raw, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Cut Flowers: Be Creative! (3Stems each)

Dill Flowers: Used for pickling: carrots, jalapenos, green beans, cabbage, fennel, green tomatoes, swiss chard stems, okra, and so many other vinegar favorites.

Storage: keep in glass of water, like fresh flowers, use quickly.

TWO of the Following: Cantaloupe, Watermelon, blackberries, Apples.

braised, garnish, gelato, popsicles, tart.

Storage: (melons) Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, then remove rind, cut into cubes or slices and store in the fridge.

Okra OR Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled. (okra): baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Remove from bag, store in a container with a damp cloth covering the beans, close lid slightly. (okra) Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!Beets OR Cabbage OR Carrots:

Beets OR Cabbage OR Carrots:braised, candied, cupcakes, juiced, pickled, roasted, smashed (cabbage) braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps.

Storage: (carrots & Beets) Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops. (Cabbage)Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

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2015 Summer CSA – Week 15

***This is an ODD week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Bluffton (On-Farm), Columbus, Dothan, & Tallahassee.

This Saturday marked the beginning of summer. What will you do with yours?

Summer is a time of traveling, vacations, family, food, and great books! I want to list out a couple of wonderful reads that I have been given. I am hoping that this post will stir others to list some of their favorite food and/or cookbooks. Food is and always be the topic of debate, intrigue, mystery and passion. Whether you love to cook or love to eat, we live in a world with billions of other eaters & cooks. We have so much to learn from each other. Please send me your favorite food books!

Omnivore’s Dilemma & Cooked: Michael Pollan

Farm City: Novella Carpenter

Jayber Crow: Wendell Berry

Ad Hoc: Thomas Keller

Summerland: Anne Quantrano

The Flavor Bible: Karen Page & Andrew Dornenburg

Cooking for Geeks: Jeff Potter

New this Share: Cucumbers, Cut Flowers & Cantaloupe!

Cucumbers: This is a summertime favorite! It subtly says refreshment like few other things do. It is so simple, yet so tasty. Enjoy your cukes!

Cut Flowers: we wanted to share a little sunshine with you so we picked some fresh flowers and sent them along to your CSA pick up! Please take 3 stems from the mason jar, you can choose which ever color combinations you desire!

Cantaloupe: Believe it or not this melon is actually related to the cucumber & squash. As crazy as it sounds, pumpkins, melons, gourds, squashes, and cukes are all cousins.

Perfect pairings:

Cantaloupe, Cucumber, Mint & Feta salad: cut into desired size, toss with feta and mint then enjoy!

Cabbage & Dill Flower coleslaw: Allow the dill flower to add some zest to your next batch of coleslaw.

Cantaloupe & Mint Popsicles: Juice your cantaloupe & mint. Freeze into popsicle containers.

Braised Cantaloupe & Beets with a hint of Mint: Braise your cantaloupe and beets with a little red wine vinegar for a sweet & savory topping to your favorite grain salad.

Organic Share Items

Cut Flowers: Be Creative!

Cantaloupe: braised, garnish, gelato, popsicles, tart.

Storage: Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, then remove rind, cut into cubes or slices and store in the fridge.

Cucumbers: raw, pickled, salads, soups, & sandwiches.

Storage: Short term storage, keep on the counter 1-2 days. If longer storage required, dry off & place in crisper drawer.

Cabbage: braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps.

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Dill Flowers: Used for pickling: carrots, jalapenos, green beans, cabbage, fennel, green tomatoes, swiss chard stems, okra, and so many other vinegar favorites.

Storage: keep in glass of water, like fresh flowers, use quickly.

Squash: bake, blacken, fry, grill, and roast, sauté, stuffed,

Storage: Store in plastic wrap, or in plastic storage bag with all of the air removed.

Eggplant: baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, and vegetarian cutlets

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Okra OR Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled. (okra): baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Storage: Remove from bag, store in a container with a damp cloth covering the beans, close lid slightly. (okra) Store in an airtight container wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Onions: braised, jams, pickled, roasted, stuffed,

Storage: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Beets: braised, candied, cupcakes, juiced, pickled, roasted, smashed

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Mint: butter mints, chickpea salad, chutney, coolers, cocktails, Feta-watermelon salads, grain salad, infused waters, pesto, smoothie, simple syrup, sorbet, tea, & yogurt dip.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Rosemary: Breads, cocktail, herb marinade, olive oil infusions, lamb, pasta, pork, potatoes, poultry

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

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2015 Spring CSA – Week 14

This is an Even Week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Albany & Atlanta.

Tallow Soap: each bar made with love.

This week we are including a bar of our handmade tallow soap, send your thank you notes over to Amber on our facebook page. It was her generous offer that allowed us to send these along this week!

Our soap is the final encore to a beautiful story. Cattle roam our pastures every hour of every day. They feel the sun on their skin, the rain on their backs, and even rub their faces in the upturned clay. The cattle are agile, playful and travel as one large entity. They are treated with respect up to their last breath, as such all of our artisans use each and every inch of the cattle in some fashion. Our cowboys, butchers, chefs, leather workers, pet treat makers, compost gurus, candle makers, and even a beauty line has been born out of the need to find a special place for every iota that comprises a cow. When you lather with this bar of soap, think of all the hands that went into creating this unique item. In its entirety, it was raised on farm, rendered on farm, and reacted with lye to create the bar that you now hold in your hands. How many bars of soap have you held that were made in one location? The only traveling they have done is directly to you. It is so simple, so sweet. Please enjoy your bar, being made from hand rendered tallow gives it a uniqueness, each batch varies in color, each bar an imperfect brick. There is so much thought that has gone into making our farm a zero waste operation, this is just one of the gifts that a cow has to offer.

New This Share: Amaranth, Sweet Potato Greens, Savory, Dill Flowers & Okra.

Amaranth & Sweet Potato Greens: Think “spinach of the summer”. These delicate greens go well as a salad or wilt beautifully under a small flame. I recommend trying them cooked and raw to determine your taste preference. A fresh vinaigrette works really well with the lightness of the greens. The amaranth is has a lovely scarlet streak running down the center of the leaf. The sweet potato greens are large full leaves with sturdy stems. Including chopped stems to a salad adds some crunch & flavor to a summer dish. The stems can also be added into a stir-fry.

Savory: This herb is known for its thyme like flavor with a hint of pepper. It can be cooked with fresh, or dried for later use. Savory pairs well with beans, and would work well with your fresh garden green beans. If you are more adventurous try pairing with grilled rabbit for a summer feast.

Dill Flower: This looks like the sparkler(firework) of the garden. Bursting with intense color & aroma it makes the ideal inclusion to summer canning recipes. We thought sending some along would encourage our at home chefs to try to pickle something fun (beans, okra, green tomatoes, cabbage, carrots & Jalapenos)

Okra: You know that summer is almost here when the Okra begins rolling in. We grow a traditional green, and a vibrant crimson on the farm. The crimson okra has a less prominent spine than the green. The flavor is similar to the traditional green okra.

Perfect Pairings:

Carrot, Jalapeno, & Dill Flowers: Try pickling them, the sweetness of the carrots, the spiciness of jalapenos and the tangy touch of the dill flower make for a wonderful pickled item.

Braised Leeks & Eggplant: Braise leeks & eggplant in balsamic vinegar.

Okra, Jalapenos, & Goat Cheese: Dice jalapenos, fold in with goat cheese, stuff okra. Bake, fry, or grill and enjoy!

Apple, Leek, Amaranth/Swt Potato Green Salad: Thinly slice apples & leeks, serve on top of a fresh bed of greens.

Lamb & Eggplant: These are my favorite summer pairings, taking a large eggplant carving it out and filling with ground lamb, eggplant, feta, nutmeg, and chipotle in adobo is extremely good. You can also make lamb meatballs to accompany eggplant parmesan!

Onions, Squash, Green Bean & Savory sauté: sweat onions, add in green beans & squash. Season with fresh savory, S&P, and fat of choice (duck, tallow, evoo, vegetable).

Organic Share Items

Amaranth OR Sweet Potato Greens: Salad, juiced, raw, steamed, sauteed,

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Savory: Herb rubs, marinades, herb roasted nuts, roasted rabbit, sausages.

Storage:

Dill Flowers: Used for pickling: carrots, jalapenos, green beans, cabbage, fennel, green tomatoes, swiss chard stems, okra, and so many other vinegar favorites.

Storage: keep in glass of water, like fresh flowers, use quickly.

Leeks OR Bunching Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Store in the crisper drawer wrapped in a damp towel, or on the counter is a shallow dish of water.

Okra: baked, blackened, curry, fresh, fried, pickled, steamed, stews, stuffed

Store in an airtight counter wrapped in a dry towel. Bruises easily, eat soon!

Squash: bake, blacken, fry, grill, and roast, sauté, stuffed,

Storage: Store in plastic wrap, or in plastic storage bag with all of the air removed.

Hot Peppers: blackened, marinade, pickled, salsa, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Eggplant: baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, and vegetarian cutlets

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Baby Carrots: candied, juiced, muffins, raw, salad, steamed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Purple, Yellow OR Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled.

Storage: Remove from bag, store in a container with a damp cloth covering the beans, close lid slightly.

Onions: braised, jams, pickled, roasted, stuffed,

Storage: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Apples OR Beets: braised, candied, cupcakes, juiced, pickled, roasted, smashed

Storage: (Beets)Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

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Spring CSA 2015 – Week 13

***This is an ODD week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Bluffton (On-Farm), Columbus, Dothan, & Tallahassee.

Low rumbles from nearby thunderstorms surround the farm today. It gives this feeling of anticipation. Waiting for the sudden storm, the refreshing rain, and the cool breeze. Small storm clouds swirl around the little town of Bluffton. As tiny droplets tap on your roofs, windows and cars listen intently. It is one of the sweetest sounds on earth.

This share is bursting with a unique array of goods from the farm. These are things that sounded good to me this share.

Perfect Pairings:

Roasted Beets & Hot Peppers, tossed with Basil & feta.

Green Tomato & Swiss Chard soup topped with blackened Bunching Onions.

Onion, Carrot, Hot Pepper, Chard Stem, Bunching Onion & Cabbage stir-fry!

….and these are wonderful sounding dishes from the interwebs:

Green Tomato Pasta Sauce

Moroccan Roasted Carrot & Eggplant Quinoa Salad

New this share: Squash & Hot Peppers!

This is the first appearance of peppers & squash of the season! Soon other varieties of both squash (zucchini, patty pan, rhonde de nice), and peppers (sweet roasting, bell) will be ready for harvest and pack into your shares! Be on the lookout for more interesting items to come!

Organic Share Items

Squash: bake, blacken, fry, grill, and roast, sauté, stuffed,

Storage: Store in plastic wrap, or in plastic storage bag with all of the air removed.

Hot Peppers: blackened, marinade, pickled, salsa, stuffed.

Storage: Store unwashed peppers in a paper towel, wrap around each pepper and store in crisper drawer.

Bunching Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Storage: Remove rubber band, wrap bulbs in damp paper towel.

Eggplant: baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, and vegetarian cutlets

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Baby Carrots: candied, juiced, muffins, raw, salad, steamed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Basil: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Purple, Yellow OR Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled.

Storage: Remove from bag, store in a container with a damp cloth covering the beans, close lid slightly.

Tomatoes Green: blackened, burgers, canned, cocktails, jams, salad, salsa, sandwich, sautéed, sliced, stuffed, soup/stew. Green (chutney, fried, pickled, sandwiches, salsa.)

Storage: Ripe(counter, windowsill, paper bag), Green(fridge)

Onions: braised, jams, pickled, roasted, stuffed,

Storage: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Beets: braised, candied, cupcakes, juiced, pickled, roasted, smashed

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Cabbage: braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps

Storage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Swiss Chard: braise, pesto, pickling (stems), raw, salads, stir-fry, sautéed, wraps.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

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Spring CSA 2015 – Week 12

This is an Even Week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Albany & Atlanta.

Thus begins a new month, and with each moon new crops blossom and fade. As we say farewell to collards, kale, & Asian Greens we welcome fruit, eggplants, & beans! This is the bittersweet transition between cool weather spring crops and heat loving summer staples. As we say goodbye to our greens get ready to welcome all the summertime favorites.

I have had some lovely shout outs from our CSA members as to what they are creating with their share items. Keep them coming! These comments and suggestions give inspiration to your community of eaters.

This is from Seth, one of our CSA members:

“Off the top of my head week is fresh salsa, buffalo roasted cauliflower, thai chicken and swiss chard tom yum soup, chicken caprese and pickled fennel.”

Please keep sending suggestions, for recipes, preparations, sneaky substitutions, and cookbooks! These keep us all on our toes, and enjoying items in new ways. If you have a recipe you would like to share on the blog send it to me and we will make it readily available to everyone!

New this Share: Various Fruits (*see organic share list) Eggplant, Leeks & Dill.

Fruit: This is the first fruit of the season, savor the delicious! Each fruit has its own delicious characteristic!

Eggplant: A summertime favorite. This purple beauty comes in various shapes, shades and weights. Some of our plants bare large globes, others small fingerlings. Our crops are split between Asian & Italian varieties. This link gives a wonderful history as well as pictorial. It works well in sauces, it marinades beautifully and can be used in any preparation that calls for chicken.

Leeks: The gentle cousin of the onion. A sweet & mild Allium, that is wonderful as the base to many stocks, soups, and sauces. Enjoy your bundle of leeks with one of the following suggestions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Dill: A cousin to carrots, cilantro, & celery. This herb, is reminiscent of a pickled flavor, it is fresh and distinct. It adds a nice subtle flavor to martinis, yogurt dips, fresh salads, and soups.

Organic Share Items

Leeks OR Bunching Onions: braised, frittata, latkes, quiche, risotto, savory muffins, salads, soup/stew/stock.

Storage: Leeks (Store in the crisper drawer wrapped in a damp towel, or on the counter is a shallow dish of water.) Bunching Onions (Remove rubber band, wrap bulbs in damp paper towel.)

Eggplant: baba ghanoush, braised, baked goods, eggplant Parmesan, fried, grilled, kabob, marinated, moussaka, roasted, stuffed, tarts, and vegetarian cutlets

Storage: If using quickly, it can be left on the counter. If longer storage is required, place in crisper, no container.

Apples OR Blackberries OR Peaches OR Pears: fresh, compote, preserves, sweet jams, tarts, popsicles, dehydrated, drunken, gelato, marinated, pickled, salsa,

Storage: Berries(Place in a single layer on a paper towel lined plate in the fridge.) Stone Fruit (

Baby Carrots: candied, juiced, muffins, raw, salad, steamed.

Storage: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.

Mint: butter mints, chickpea salad, chutney, coolers, cocktails, Feta-watermelon salads, grain salad, infused waters, pesto, smoothie, simple syrup, sorbet, tea, & yogurt dip.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Dill: creamy sauces, dressings, fish, herb rub, pickling, marinades.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (stems only).

Purple, Yellow OR Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled.

Storage: Remove from bag, store in a container with a damp cloth covering the beans, close lid slightly.

Tomatoes(Ripe OR Cherry OR Green): blackened, burgers, canned, cocktails, jams, salad, salsa, sandwich, sautéed, sliced, stuffed, soup/stew. Green (chutney, fried, pickled, sandwiches, salsa.)

Storage: Ripe(counter, windowsill, paper bag), Green(fridge)

Sweet Onions: braised, jams, pickled, roasted, stuffed,

Storage: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Beets OR Cabbage: Beets(braised, candied, cupcakes, juiced, pickled, roasted, smashed.) Cabbage(braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps.)

Storage: Beets(: Remove rubber bands. Immediately remove leafy greens, approx. ¼ away from root. Leaving greens attached causes the roots to wilt & become soft. Keep roots in a gallon sized Ziploc with the bag half closed. *See above green storage for the removed tops.)Cabbage (Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!)

Swiss Chard: braise, pesto, pickling (stems), raw, salads, stir-fry, sautéed, wraps.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

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Spring CSA 2015 – Week 11

***This is an ODD week, therefore we will deliver half shares to the following cities: Bluffton (On-Farm), Columbus, Dothan, & Tallahassee.

Hopefully this Memorial Day allowed you to catch up on some rest, center your thoughts and enjoy good food with friends. Many times CSA members tell me that they have composted items, or had weeks where their life got busy and had too much produce for the week. They always ask what to do in those situations, usually my first thought is to freeze it for later or save it for soup stock. My partner & I recently adopted some heritage chickens from the farm. Each evening when we arrive home we have two gorgeous speckled brown gems waiting for us on our porch. We have started collecting them and now have a bundle, I find myself thinking what do I do with the excess?

There is a simple solution: present presents. If you have a friend or family member that is afraid to make the plunge into local/organic/produce/cooking or even lifestyle changes try using your excess produce to make them something special. Giving is a gift in and of itself. My favorite way to clean a fridge is to have company over. Invite friends and family for dinner, brunch, or appetizers it gives you a chance to use up excess produce while trying out new dishes. The more creative you are with the excess produce, the more the fun it will become. Spread the joy of your CSA with others. Making a difference in the food system comes from all of our efforts. Food is always a conversational subject, some of the best conversations of my life have been centered around a table with a great plate in front of me. Spark thought, eat good food.

New This Share: Cauliflower, Cilantro, & Green Beans.

Cauliflower: Known as “flowering cabbage”, it is an old variety first named in Italy. Often an under loved vegetable. However its tolerance of extreme heat, make this flowering vegetable a versatile component to any kitchen. With the rise of vegetarian and vegan lifestyles many interesting uses of cauliflower have surfaced. It can be baked with buffalo sauce, and eaten like chicken wings, or sliced and braised like little filets. It is also wonderful when roasted with tomatoes, and tossed with feta and zucchini.

Cilantro: Spanish for coriander, these leaves are referred to as fresh coriander, or coriander leaves. Cilantro is known for its fresh, green citrus notes. It pairs well with lime juice, as such it pairs well with homemade salsa, guacamole, yogurt sauces and vinaigrettes!

Green Beans: Also known as snap beans, string beans, Haricots Verts (French), & fine beans (British). These little fingers are absolutely wonderful, fresh, crisp, slightly sweet, & vegetal they make my mouth water just typing about them. They can be braised, blanched, pan fried, or even enjoyed at their most lovely: fresh.

Organic Share Items

Cauliflower: baked, braised, curried, grain salad, steamed, soup/stew.

Storage: Store in a closed container in the fridge.

Cilantro: cocktails, creamy sauces, dips, falafels, herb rub, marinade, pesto, Pico de Gallo, salsas.

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (only stems touching water, leaves will rot if submerged in water).

Green Beans: fresh, braised, blanched, pan fried, baked, roasted, & pickled.

Storage: Remove from bag, store in a container with a damp cloth covering the beans, close lid slightly.

Broccoli: braised, casseroles, char-grilled, curried, fresh, fried-rice, pasta, soups/stews stir-fry.

Storage: Wrap in a damp towel, place on plate in fridge.

Tomatoes: blackened, burgers, canned, cocktails, jams, salad, salsa, sandwich, sautéed, sliced, stuffed, soup/stew.

Storage: counter, windowsill, paper bag

Sweet Onions: braised, jams, pickled, roasted, stuffed,

Storage: Store in a cool, dark space with good ventilation. Do Not stack, Do Not store with potatoes.

Basil: bruschetta, pesto, pizza, sauces

Storage: Keep in fridge in a plastic bag, or out on the counter in a shallow glass of water (only stems touching water, leaves will rot if submerged in water).

Cabbage: Place in a Ziploc in the back of your fridge, outer leaves will wilt. If the outer leaves are wilted, discard outer leaves the inner leaves are perfect!

Storage: braised, dumplings, fermented, pickled, raw, rolls, sauerkraut, slaw, steamed, stews, stir-fry, soups & wraps.

Fennel: braised, raw salads, risotto, roasted, stews & soups

Storage: Short term storage- in a shallow dish of water on the counter. Long term storage- place in an air tight container with a little water.

Head Lettuce: burgers, fresh salads, sandwiches, braised, raw, wraps

Storage: Remove from bag, store in an airtight container.

Swiss Chard: braise, pesto, pickling (stems), raw, salads, stir-fry, sautéed, wraps.

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

Kale: creamed, pesto, risotto, salad, sautéed, stir-fry, stew

Storage: Remove rubber bands from greens and wrap in a damp towel, and place leaves first into a plastic container. If stems stick out, wrap in a damp cloth to prevent moisture loss.

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